Does a monk with Unarmored movement still have to make strength checks to “run”/”climb” a wall?

If a Level 9 (or higher) monk, with the Unarmored Movement feature, wanted to climb a 1000-ft sheer cliff, would they have to make strength checks every turn to see if they continue climbing, fall, or stay where they are? Or would they just keep going without making checks?

(Related question.)

How to give node sillouhette when behind wall

I am working on a boss-rush fps game. I want it to be like the eye of cthulu fight from terraria, with the enemy flying towards you and then turning around to try again if it misses. However, in order for that to work, the enemy must be visible when they are under the ground. How could I accomplish this? I took this image from a post about a similar question, but for Unity, not Godot.

Should a Bugbear PC take damage when holding an enemy on the other side of a Wall of Fire with Grapple?

Bugbears have long arms, allowing them to grapple enemies 10 ft. away.

The Bugbear’s square is not in the effect range of the Wall of Fire. However, about 5 ft. worth of one of the Bugbear’s hands is supposedly in a square that is.

Mechanically, should the Bugbear take damage? If so, simulationally, how do we reconcile that such a small fraction of the player being in the square and taking just as much damage as a character residing fully in the area of effect?

Does Wall of Fire hurt people inside a Leomund’s Tiny Hut?

Leomund’s Tiny Hut says

Creatures and objects⁠ within the dome when you cast this spell can move through it freely. All other creatures and objects⁠ are barred from passing through it. Spells and other magical Effects can’t extend through the dome or be cast through it. The Atmosphere inside the space is comfortable and dry, regardless of the weather outside.

Wall of Fire says

When the wall appears, each creature within its area must make a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, a creature takes 5d8 fire damage, or half as much damage on a successful save. One side of the wall, selected by you when you cast this spell, deals 5d8 fire damage to each creature that ends its turn within 10 feet of that side or inside the wall. A creature takes the same damage when it enters the wall for the first time on a turn or ends its turn there. The other side of the wall deals no damage.

Does Tiny Hut negate the magical heat or Wall of Fire cook the adventurer?

Cast shatter on the otherside of a wall

So I was wondering if you could cast shatter on the otherwise of a wall or a point that you can’t see. Shatter says that you it casts from a point that you choose. Doesn’t say anything about how it’s casts besides from it erupting from a point so it’s not a line. And would that mean I can cast it in a room above me for example without even needing to see it. It says that if it’s you cast an AOE it comes onto the nearside of that obstruction, is that based on a line from where you cast or where the spell origininates.

Is it possible to escape from a wall of stone spell on the turn it is cast by flying?

The spell wall of stone allows those that might be trapped by it a chance to escape during the action in which it is ‘springing into existence’.

If a creature would be surrounded on all sides by the wall (or the wall and another solid surface), that creature can make a Dexterity saving throw. On a success, it can use its reaction to move up to its speed so that it is no longer enclosed by the wall.

Consider a caster making a wall with a roof to enclose a creature with flying movement capability.

Suppose the horizontal distance from the creature to any point outside the wall is greater than its speed so that even a successful Dex save will not allow it to escape enclosure.

Further suppose that because the wall is wider and longer than it is high, the creature is capable of moving outside the wall vertically, if it is allowed to use its flying speed.

Does "its speed" in the spell description include flying speed?

It seems common sense that if a flying creature could walk out of the area enclosed by the wall as a reaction, it could also fly out of the area, but does RAW allow this? If I understand correctly, using "speed" does not subsume all forms of speed, but means walking speed only, sensu stricto.

"Speed" (PHB) (emphasis mine)

Every character and monster has a speed, which is the distance in feet that the character or monster can walk in 1 round.

"Speed" (MM 8) (emphasis mine)

SPEED A monster’s speed tells you how far it can move on its turn. For more information on speed, see the Player’s Handbook.
All creatures have a walking speed, simply called the monster’s speed. Creatures that have no form of ground-based locomotion have a walking speed of 0 feet.
Some creatures have one or more of the following additional movement modes
FLY
A monster that has a flying speed can use all or part of its movement to fly.

If the description of the wall of stone spell allows only a creature’s speed to be used in its reaction, does "speed" mean only its walking speed since it is not otherwise specified? Although the creature has a flying speed, this is an ‘additional movement mode’ that is not designated by the spell’s permitted use of speed?

Suppose that flying speed may be used to escape the wall. The trigger for permitting the creature’s reactive movement is it being "surrounded on all sides" [sic]. If not surrounded, then, it appears that no reaction is permitted. Thus, if flying movement is permitted, does making the wall of stone appear without a roof mean that the creature is not surrounded by the wall, and thus is not permitted its reaction to attempt to escape?

Of course, without a roof the creature could then fly out on its next turn, but a lot could happen between the caster’s turn and the creature’s turn. Interestingly, if flying movement was a permitted form of reaction, the caster could then make a much smaller wall to still enclose the creature. The horizontal distance to the walls could now be made within the distance the creature could walk, and it would still not be allowed a reaction, since leaving off the roof would mean that it was not surrounded.

Is it possible to escape a roofed wall of stone on the turn it is cast by flying?
If so, can this escape be prevented by casting the wall without a roof?

Can two mages cast Wall of Fire in the same place?

I’ve been playing D&D for a long time but I’ve never encountered this situation until now. If a party has a wizard and a sorceress who both know Wall of Fire, can they cast it in the same place? Say most of the enemies are standing in a big conga line and it’s clearly one of the best spells to take them out. The mages happen to come one after the other in the turn order.

The description of Wall of Fire says:

When the wall appears, each creature within its area must make a Dexterity saving throw. On a failed save, a creature takes 5d8 fire damage, or half as much damage on a successful save.

One side of the wall, selected by you when you cast this spell, deals 5d8 fire damage to each creature that ends its turn within 10 feet of that side or inside the wall. A creature takes the same damage when it enters the wall for the first time on a turn or ends its turn there. The other side of the wall deals no damage.

Do the enemies standing in the area of effect take damage from each of the spells when they are cast? If they end their turn in the double fire wall, do they take 5d8 damage from each caster? For instant spells like Acid Splash it makes sense to me that the damage is applied with each cast, even if it is the same type. But if it’s a continuous area of effect like Cloud of Daggers (PHB, p. 222), do the damages stack?

How does Wall of Force interact with objects?

Wall of Force discusses what happens when it goes through a creature’s space:

If the wall cuts through a creature’s space when it appears, the creature is pushed to one side of the wall (your choice which side).

…and I assume similar logic can be applied to small/medium sized objects such as chairs that can be moved.

But what about objects that are not a creature, or a single creature, and aren’t particularly mobile?

For example:

a) An enemy is hanging from a rope. Mage casts a horizontal Wall of Force that "cuts" through the rope.

b) A Chain Devil has grappled the fighter from 10′ away with its Chain attack that has 10′ reach. Mage casts Wall of Force between them as part of a hemisphere, hoping to cut the chain and trap the devil.

If the object was a stone wall, I think most would agree that the stone wall stops the Wall of Force as the panels wouldn’t be contiguous or the sphere wouldn’t be able to expand in a direct line from its point of origin.

Does something as thing as a rope or chain have a similar effect?

Could the area of a Wall of Force be greatly reduced just by having streamers hanging from the ceiling, or standing in a forest with a bunch of tall trees?

How to prepare my party to reasonable be able to bring down a prismatic wall?


Background

In my campaign I have a villain who uses misdirection and avoidance as their main combat methods. As last resort when the party confronts them in their lair it would be appropriate for them to use Prismatic Wall to prevent the party from killing or capturing them.

Prismatic Wall requires 7 different, very specific, spells in a specific order to remove. Namely; Cone of Cold, Gust of Wind, Disintegrate, Passwall, Magic Missile, Daylight, and Dispel Magic.

This enemy is clever but arrogant, they will likely cast this spell toward the end of a drawn out battle meaning the party may already be down on resources. Without warning they might need to defeat a Prismatic Wall the party may expend the required resources before it appears.

Party Details

In my party I have:

  • A Half-Elf Wizard
  • A Human Druid
  • A Gnome Oracle
  • A Halfling Bard
  • A Half-Orc Paladin.

The party is currently 9th level and they will likely confront this enemy some time between 12th and 14th level depending on how direct their approach is.

The party is equipped slightly below normal for their level due to some decisions made to this point in the campaign. None of their current items will be a particular benefit in this task.

The Problem

I would like my party to have a reasonable chance of actually being able to bring down this wall. If I just throw it at them the chance of this is basically 0. This is the first campaign for all of my players and they have never encounter anything like this before.

Between the various spellcasters in the party they already have access to 5 out of the 7 required spells. Disintegrate and Passwall being the exceptions. I can easily provide them access to the others between now and the confrontation. However, the party does not always prepare these specific spells and may not have them available when required.

How can I, as DM, prepare my players to defeat a Prismatic Wall spell, without explicitly telling them it is coming?

I will likely need to provide them both with information on how to defeat it and provide some resources to help them do so. I am willing to provide help in the form of items, lore dumps from NPCs and potentially NPC allies, though I prefer not to have NPC perform critical actions in place of the players.

What are the permitted shapes of a Wall of Fire?

The text of the Wall of Fire spell is found on page 285 of my printing of the Fifth Edition Player’s Handbook. The following is all the text states regarding how the wall is shaped:

[…] You can make the wall up to 60 feet long, 20 feet high, and 1 foot thick, or a ringed wall up to 20 feet in diameter, 20 feet high, and 1 foot thick.

I believe there are two reasonable readings of this text:

  1. The wall is an arbitrary shape whose length does not exceed 60 feet. As a special case, if the shape is a ring, its length is instead the circumference of a circle whose diameter is 20 feet (in other words, treat pi as 3 for the sake of simplicity).
  2. The wall has exactly two permitted shapes: a straight line up to 60 feet long, and a circle 20 feet in diameter.

I haven’t been able to find any additional clarification from official sources indicating which reading is intended, but I have found plenty of evidence indicating that different people are using both of these interpretations in play, citing indicative but not conclusive evidence outside the spell text. What is the official intended reading for this spell?