Are there formula’s for Warforged Armor? (Proficiency + Dex + 11 =AC)

The WarForged have 3 separate armor types of which from UA, that determine their AC, as armor has no effect on them nor does it stack. I was wondering if there was a Formula for me to utilize for the modifier section in the armor section below. Where it takes the current proficiency bonus and/or dex modifier (just PB for heavy armor) adds it to a number 11,13,16 and then determines my AC?

Formula like AC = dex + pb + number

This is on ROLL20 GIFFGLYPHS

DEX & pb

Armor and Modifier section

The Armor Types

Could the souls of Warforged be Quori?

I’m trying to develop a 5th edition D&D campaign set in Eberron. I know that the cause of the day of Mourning is open to interpretation, but I would like to relate the cause to the Dreaming Dark. I would like to ask for some ideas about Magitech for transporting Quori to Eberron from Dal Qour, and placing them inside of warforged. Would this make sense canonically?

Can elves, half-elves, warforged, and/or kalashtar be affected by Dream of the Blue Veil?

The Fey Ancestry racial trait shared by elves (Player’s Handbook, p. 23) and half-elves (p. 39) states “magic can’t put you to sleep.” Warforged’s Constructed Resilience trait is similar: “You don’t need to sleep, and magic can’t put you to sleep” (Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 36). Kalashtar have a racial trait called Severed from Dreams, which reads (p. 31):

Kalashtar sleep, but they don’t connect to the plane of dreams as other creatures do. Instead, their minds draw from the memories of their otherworldly spirit while they sleep. As such, you are immune to spells and other magical effects that require you to dream, like dream, but not to spells and other magical effects that put you to sleep, like sleep.

The spell dream of the blue veil begins with the following paragraph (Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything, p. 106; emphasis mine):

You and up to eight willing creatures within range fall unconscious for the spell’s duration and experi­ence visions of another world on the Material Plane, such as Oerth, Toril, Krynn, or Eberron. If the spell reaches its full duration, the visions conclude with each of you encountering and pulling back a mys­terious blue curtain. The spell then ends with you mentally and physically transported to the world that was in the visions.

A sidebar next to the spell reads (p. 106, emphasis mine):

Transit between [different worlds on the Material Plane] is rare but not im­possible and can be accomplished in various ways. […One] method is the Dream of Other Worlds; trav­elers fall into a deep slumber and dream themselves into a new realm. The spell dream of the blue veil em­ploys this method of transit.

My question is, can elves, half-elves, warforged, and/or kalashtar be affected by dream of the blue veil?

My current interpretation of RAW is that the answer is “no” for all four creatures. The sidebar outright states that dream of the blue veil induces “slumber” (thus excluding elves, half-elves, and warforged from being affected) and causes its targets to dream (excluding kalashtar). However, there are a few reasons I might be wrong.

Nowhere in the spell’s actual text do the words “sleep,” “slumber,” or “dream” appear. It refers only to creatures becoming “unconscious” and experiencing “visions.” Contrast this with sleep, which “sends creatures into a magical slumber” and refers to its affected targets as “sleepers” (PHB, p. 276). Contrast also with dream, which “shapes a creature’s dreams,” doesn’t affect a target until it’s “asleep,” and explicitly states that “Creatures that don’t sleep, such as elves, can’t be contacted by this spell” (p. 236).

Commenters in this Reddit thread largely agree that the lack of sleep- and dream-related language in the spell’s text means RAW is that kalashtar can be affected. One commenter points out the similarity to the spell catnap, which can affect elves.

Maybe the Tasha’s Cauldron sidebar, like the title of the spell, is simply some extra lore that doesn’t affect gameplay. However, I see no reason to exclude sidebars from RAW. Many important rules, such as the ones for hiding (PHB, p. 177) and some rules governing wizards’ spellbooks (p. 114), appear only in sidebars.

Another Reddit commenter points to “Spell Spotlight: Dream of the Blue Veil,” a D&D Beyond article which contains the following sentence:

A kalashtar wizard who uses the dream [created by dream of the blue veil] to flee the agents of the Dreaming Dark by escaping to Krynn may buy themself enough time to gather new allies, new resources, and return to Eberron with a bold new plan to defeat their enemies.

This obviously implies that kalashtar can be affected by the spell. I imagine that this could be an oversight, and I don’t especially see why this article should be considered RAW. But again, I could be wrong.

Does the now updated Integrated Protection feature of the Warforged mean they are counted as “wearing” armor?

The new and updated Warforged’s Integrated Protection feature, detailed in Ebberon Rising from the Last War, now states:

Integrated Protection

Your body has built-in defensive layers, which can be enhanced with armor.

[…]

  • You can don only armor with which you have proficiency. To don armor […]. To doff armor […]. You can rest while donning or doffing armor in this way.
  • While you live, your armor can’t be removed from your body against your will.

With this revised wording, does the warforged now count as wearing armor?

This is important in the context of how something like integrating a set of Plate Mail would interact with Monk features like Martial Arts.

Can magic tattoos be used by warforged, or other constructs such as the battle smith artificer’s steel defender?

Magic tattoos all say things akin to the following:

To attune to this item, you hold the needle to your skin where you want the tattoo to appear, pressing the needle there throughout the attunement process. When the attunement is complete, the needle turns into the ink that becomes the tattoo, which appears on the skin.

They each appear on the skin, they are applied by being held to the skin. Can the metal body of a warforged use it? If so, the only other item I am aware of that has race specific requirements is the dwarven thrower.

It dawned on me that warforged aren’t considered constructs in 5e (at least I don’t think there is a distinction made for what player characters are). However, I think it should be considered that what would bar constructs from being able to use the tattoos is that the tattoos specifically say how you apply it to the skin, or how it appears on the skin. I think this would be the same disqualifying factor for warforged, or for other ‘constructs.’

Can Warforged be Targeted by the Clone Spell?

The Clone spell’s Components include (PHB p.222):

… at least one cubic inch of flesh of the creature that is being cloned, …

and Warforged do not have flesh, the same as other Humanoids do (ERftLW p. 35):

Warforged are made from wood and metal, …

Root like cords infused with alchemical fluids serve ads there muscles, wrapped around a frame of steel, darkwood, or stone. …

This alone would seem to imply they cannot be targeted by the Clone spell, however their description also includes:

Although they were manufactured, warforged are living humanoids. Resting, healing magic, and the medicine skill all provide the same benefits to warforged that they do to other humanoids.

Would this include the Clone spell? I’m struggling to understand whether this would be considered healing magic, and if an inch of the warforged’s "flesh" would work here.

Can a living character (IE. Human NPC) become a contruct (IE. Warforged) via a soul/host transfer?

Im making a pseudo doctor character (Player or NPC), and would like to know if I can link a living characters soul to say, a vacant warforged body so that if the entity dies their soul would go into the Warforged and take it over. Is there any spells that can do anything like this in official D&D? If not, do you think something like this would be too outrageous for home-brew? The goal is for the person to retain complete autonomy, so Necromancy is prohibited.

Does the +1 AC bonus from the Warforged racial trait Integrated Protection and the Forge Domain cleric’s Blessings of the Forge stack?

The Warforged race (from Eberron: Rising from the Last War, p. 36) has a racial feature called Integrated Protection, which among other things, grants the following:

  • You gain a +1 bonus to Armor Class

The Forge Domain for the cleric (from Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, p. 19) has a class feature called Blessings of the Forge, which grants the following:

At 1st level, you gain the ability to imbue magic into a weapon or armor. At the end of a long rest, you can touch one nonmagical object that is a suit of armor or a simple or martial weapon. Until the end of your next long rest or until you die, the object becomes a magic item, granting a +1 bonus to AC if it’s armor or …

Recently, a player wanted to make a Warforged Forge Domain cleric and wondered if these two features would stack (meaning, the racial +1 stacking with wearing magical armor enchanted via Blessings of the Forge), allowing effectively +2 to AC. Is there any reason this wouldn’t work?

Warforged Cleric of the Forge starting with too much HP… why?

Created a Warforged Cleric of the Forge, Using the official D&D Beyond tool. It came out with 15hp at level 1. Where did the extra 4hp came from? I have a 17 CON for a +3 bonus, so it should be 8+3=11, yeah? I also re-made him using the Fight Club iOS app, and in there he shows up with 11hp. What am I missing?

Here’s a link to my character sheet: https://ddb.ac/characters/31270418/bpyQtf

Am I misreading the effect-cancelling part of Warforged Juggernaut’s Crag of Steel power, or is it meant to be extremely limited?

Warforged Juggernaut‘s Level 20 Daily Power is Crag of Steel; a stance that gives you a bunch of stuff, but the part of the power I’m interested in here is:

“Until the stance ends, you gain resist 5 to all damage, and whenever this reduces an attack’s damage to 0, you also negate that attack’s effect on you.”


The way I’m reading this, in order for this to kick in: an attack must do damage, which must be less than 5, AND also deal an effect.

An attack that just deals an effect isn’t ignored because the stance doesn’t “reduce the attack’s damage to 0″ – it already was 0 (or rather, there was no damage/null/etc.)

I can’t envision any other way of triggering the text in question;

  • Resistance doesn’t stack.
  • If a different resistance is higher and negates the attack it doesn’t count because it’s “whenever THIS [Resist 5] reduces an attack”.
  • Temporary hit points are just me taking the damage somewhere else…
  • ???

At best, I can see it synergising with a handful of specific powers that otherwise reduce attack damage by mechanics other than resist, but those are few and far between (and generally reduce the damage by a not significant enough amount to negate 90% of a reasonable opponent’s damage.)(And my party hasn’t picked any of the dozen specific paragon paths/backgrounds that get them.)

Overall, this means, I can’t really see an occasion where this text would actually kick in. It’s good for negating level 1 creature’s attack effects if they happen to roll a 1 on their damage dice… as a level 20 Daily.

(Don’t get me wrong, the rest of the power is fine. Resist 5 is fine. Free damage is good. Resist forced movement is good. It’s just an unlikely enough confluence of events for that power to trigger that.. it feels like I’m missing something?)

TL;DR: Am I mis-reading this part of the Crag of Steel power or is it just not going to come up in normal level-appropriate fights?