Where does a creature – flying low over a large body of water – descend when subject to the Earthbind spell?

In looking at the question Can the Erupting Earth spell be cast somewhere that isn’t on “ground”? other examples of spells involving the "ground" could be useful. Or not. Which lead to the question, where does a creature – flying low over a large body of water – descend when subject to the Earthbind spell?


According to the description of Earthbind:

An airborne creature affected by this spell safely descends at 60 feet per round until it reaches the ground or the spell ends. (XGtE pg 155)


Assuming the creature began its turn 60 feet above the water and failed its Strength saving throw, would the spell end:

a) when the creature reaches the water’s surface after 1 round (in other words, is the surface of the water "ground"?), or

b) would the creature continue to descend for the remaining 9 rounds for as much as 540 feet to the earthen bottom of the body of water (see note below), or

c) would the spell fail altogether, or

d) would the creature be forced essentially sideways for the duration of the spell, towards the nearest point of land, or

e) other?


Note re being forced towards bottom of large body of water:

Given a creature with 10 Constitution, 30 ft movement, and no innate swimming speed, its movement in the ocean would be 30 ft using both its Movement and Action to "Dash" (or 20 ft in difficult terrain).

540 ft of total movement would take 18 rounds (27 rounds in difficult terrain) and the creature – assuming it can’t breathe underwater or teleport in some fashion – would be unable to hold its breath after 10 rounds and would drop to 0 hit points after the next round.


’cause if the surface of the ocean is ground, guess what might . . . erupt?

Can Dungeon World’s sanctify make salt water drinkable?

The description of Sanctify is,

Food and water you hold in your hands while you cast this spell is consecrated by your deity. In addition to now being holy or unholy, the affected substance is purified of any mundane spoilage.

I’m curious as to whether this can be used to desalinate a cup of water the cleric is holding. From what I can tell, that is dependent on what is included in mundane spoilage

Mundane has two definitions, one being a synonym to "dull, boring," and one being

of this earthly world rather than a heavenly or spiritual one

Using the second definition, desalination would be considered "mundane". I’m not sure if salt water could be considered spoiled, though.

Can Tentacle of the Deeps be cast on the surface of water?

The Warlock subclass The Fathomless has an ability called Tentacle of the Deeps that reads:

You can magically summon a spectral tentacle that strikes at your foes. As a bonus action, you create a 10-foot-long tentacle at a point you can see within 60 feet of you. The tentacle lasts for 1 minute or until you use this feature to create another tentacle. When you create the tentacle, you can make a melee spell attack against one creature within 10 feet of it. On a hit, the target takes 1d8 cold damage, and its speed is reduced by 10 feet until the start of your next turn. When you reach 10th level in this class, the damage increases to 2d8. As a bonus action on your turn, you can move the tentacle up to 30 feet and repeat the attack. You can summon the tentacle a number of times equal to your proficiency bonus, and you regain all expended uses when you finish a long rest.

Would that be able to stand on the surface of water?

Are there any 3rd level spells a Lore Bard could pick at 6th character level to provide food and water to the party?

Just as the title says. I play a Bard, College of Lore. At 6th character level I will be able to pick up two spells, of up to 3rd spell level, from any class. I know we will be on the long-term adventure with no easy way to get food and drinks. Goodberries could make it much easier for us, but I do not want to "waste" a 3rd level spell known for a 1st level spell if there is something of more power available to me.

Preference is for material from Player’s Handbook and Xanathar’s Guide To Everything as it is automatically allowed. If there are multiple spells that meet the requirement, the one with the widest utility wins. If there are none, the highest level and biggest utility are the factor.

How much holy water is needed to cast Protection from Evil and Good?

In the PHB on page 270 we can read in the desription of Protection from Evil and Good that:

Components: V,S,M(holy water or powdered silver and iron, which the spell consumes)

Since the material components are consumed, they cannot be replaced with a spellcasting focus, as per the PHB (p.203)

If a spell states that a material component is consumed by the spell, the caster must provide this component for each casting of the spell.

This is reinforced by sage advice:

A spellcasting focus can be used in place of a material component only if that component has no cost noted in the spell’s description and if that component isn’t consumed.

The description does not list a cost in gp though. Which brings about the question above. While holy water is created in discrete 25gp “units”, powdered silver and iron are not, so we cannot just assume that you need 1 unit of holy water (ie. 25gp worth).

So, is a sprinkle of holy water enough? (Allowing the caster to use 1 unit for multiple castings.)

If one would use silver and iron, how much would they need? 25gp worth? Just “some”?

How much force can the Shape Water cantrip exert?

The Shape Water cantrip never mentions the force it can produce. The only limit I can see is the line:

[…] doesn’t have enough force to cause damage.

Otherwise there is no limit to the force. Hence, I would assume that it can exert an amount of force not more than to cause damage to the object it will be interacting with.

So, by RAW as I see it, one can move water up to 5ft per casting with unlimited force as long as it isn’t causing damage. Technically this cantrip may move a massive boulder at the incredible speed of 0.254km/h (5ft/6s) with no regard to the boulder’s weight, as long as the boulder doesn’t take damage.

I understand that this is a pretty specific thing, but it would seem that this spell can be pretty useful in certain cases if it indeed works this way. Am I assuming the rules correctly?

Will reducing the cost of Holy Water or improving its effectiveness break things

My L3 LMoP group are planning on picking up some holy water to help with zombies as they’ve heard to tales of undead (old owl well, and thunder tree), but I think they’re going to be very disappointed to find its 25Gp, but is single use, costs an action, affects a single target, and only does the same damage as a greatsword swing.

Essentially, it seems to be only as good as a single decent fighter attack, but uses an action and costs 25Gp. Given that an average L3 PC might expect to do say ~D6 +3 damage with a typical attack, this means they’re getting about 3 extra damage, once, for 25Gp, which seems absurd. Plus it only works on certain foes.

Am I missing something?!

I’d like to make this work for them, so I’m considering some changes to the rules for Holy Water:

  1. Reduce the cost – maybe as low as 5Gp, given that they have a paladin who is visiting a temple to make his oath (this allows me to keep the price higher on other occasions if they did find a way to abuse it)
  2. Make it more effective – maybe an AoE effect?

Will this break the game, or be something they can heavily abuse later?

What are the rules for a long fall into water? [duplicate]

Normally when a player falls they take 1d6 bludgeoning damage when they hit the ground per 10 foot they fall.

Are there any RAW for a player hitting water? At what height does hitting water in DnD become dangerous. In reality if you hit water from high enough it is the equivalent of hitting concrete and a I imagine from even a safe hight a player that dives badly may hurt themselves?