What’s the Difference Between Bath Mats & Bath Rugs?

When we step out of the bathtub or shower, it is nice to have a soft, plush, and warm place for our feet to land. Most of us have a bath mat or a bath rug waiting for us to step onto in our bathrooms at home, but did you know that the two are not created equal? Do you know the difference between bath mats and bath rugs? If not, no worries – most people don’t! Nevertheless, there is in fact a difference between the two that could influence which one you select for your home bathroom.

Bath Mat vs Bath Rug
When choosing décor for your home bathroom, it is helpful to know the differences between a bath mat vs bath rug so you can choose the best option for your space. Bath mats and bath rugs each have their own specific purpose. They also feature different aesthetics, so it is important to know details about each so you can properly choose between a bath mat vs bath rug for your family.
What is a Bath Mat? – A bath mat is made specifically for preventing slips and wet floors in your bathroom. Bath mats are used right in front of your bathtub or shower to absorb water after you bathe. They are typically extra-absorbent and offer non-skid features for safety.  
What is a Bath Rug? – While luxury area rugs can also soak up water after a bath, they were really created to be a design element in your bathroom. Bath rugs can be coordinated with your bathroom theme and can match curtains, towels, and shower curtains to complete a look. They can be used anywhere in your bathroom and are not limited to the front of your bathtub or shower.
The main difference between a bath round mat and a bath rug is that while very pretty, bath mats tend to be more functional, while bath rugs are plush and give a more luxurious feel to the space. While both are great choices for your home bathroom, it really just depends on your personal preference as to whether a bath mat vs bath rug will work best for you. Here are some tips to help you decide which is the best solution for your area.

What is the best quality wool area rug for kids’ bedrooms?
Kids rugs will certainly be put through their paces, but wool will not let you down. It can handle a fair bit of rough and tumble!
In fact wool fibres can bend up to 20,000 times without breaking. Being strong and elastic the fibres simply bounce back to their original shape, time and time again. You know, good quality materials alway go the distance.
Even if you have a no-shoe policy in your house, there will be times when you need to dash inside with your shoes on for one last thing or times when a handyman or repair person needs to wear work boots indoors. For these situations — and for shoe-on houses — door mats are essential.

Faux fur rugs add warmth (literally and design-wise) to any room. Millions of animals are killed each year to produce skin for various products, and for homeowners who don’t want to purchase real animal skins, faux sheepskins and cowhides are a guilt-free and affordable way to enjoy these soft and plush rugs.

If you are having a difficult time cleaning those pet accidents and danders, then maybe you have chosen the wrong carpet or rug material for your pets. Here, we are featuring some best pet rugs.
1. Stain-Resistant Nylon Carpets
When you have high foot traffic inside your home, we highly recommend this carpet type, because it is naturally resistant to stains. Besides that, nylon fibers are never easily pulled out when your pets are scratching on your nylon rugs or carpets.
2. Luxurious Wool Carpets
It is one of the most prestigious materials for rugs and carpets, because of its natural curb appeal. When wool fibers are properly woven, you can rely on its durable fabric construction, which can resist wear and tear.
Besides, wool can seamlessly wick off stains and liquids, so you are relieved from the daunting task of carpet stain removal. Also, its smooth fiber is highly comforting for your pets’ paws and body when it is lying down on the floor.

What’s wrong with the following dynamic TSQL?

The following generated dynamic TSQL has operation type clash which I am unable to find the problem.

exec sp_executesql  N'INSERT INTO EmployeePassword VALUES(@EmployeeCode, @Password, @EmployeeId, @EntryDate)', N'@EmployeeCode nvarchar(4000), @Password nvarchar(4000), @EmployeeId uniqueidentifier, @EntryDate datetime',  @EmployeeCode=N'SC0001', @Password=N'xxxxxx', @EmployeeId=N'B84EC880-BD58-4A64-8AA3-C86ADA108731', @EntryDate=N'2021-09-08 09:51:36.350' 

Error message I got after the execution of the above TSQL.

Msg 206, Level 16, State 2, Line 1 Operand type clash: uniqueidentifier is incompatible with datetime 

Any Idea on what the cause is?

What’s the default order used by WordPress to load CSS files?

I am working with a commercial theme on which I am making some style changes. Specifically, the parent theme shows a menu which I want to modify. The code for that menu is:

 <div class="mobile-navigation hidden-md hidden-lg">         <div id="close-menu-moblie">             <a href="#">                 <i class="icon-close icons"></i>             </a>         </div>    <div class="mobile-menu-container">         <ul id="menu-menu-movil" class="nav-menu mobile-menu">             <li id="menu-item-4723" class="menu-item menu-item-type-custom menu-item-object-custom current-menu-item current_page_item menu-item-4723 active">                 <a href="/" aria-current="page">La Familia</a>             </li>             <li id="menu-item-4724" class="menu-item menu-item-type-custom menu-item-object-custom menu-item-4724">                 <a href="/tierras.html">La Tierra</a>             </li> 

So I created a child theme and added some CSS to it in its style.css file:

#menu-menu-movil li > a {     font-weight: 500;     font-family: Poppins, Arial, sans-serif;     } 

No way: the site ignores my changes. When I inspect the HTML I see that the browser is applying instead CSS instructions from the parent theme that target different classes:

.mobile-navigation .nav-menu > li > a {     font-size: 16px;     color: #1a1a1a;     font-weight: bold;     text-transform: capitalize; } 

So I think that it’s a problem with conflicting CSS instructions and their level of specificity or whatever… but then I try opening the CSS editor in WP Admin at "Appearance / Customise / Additional CSS" and pasting there my changes… and they work.

This led me to think: is there a default order in which WordPress loads CSS from all the possible places where they can be? ("Additional CSS", child themes, parent themes…). I seem to remember that there was, but after searching around on Google for a while I couldn’t find anything. Or is my problem in the end about CSS specificity?

LED vs. LCD TVs explained: What’s the difference?

LCD Monitors
Liquid crystal display technology works by blocking light. Specifically, an LCD is made of two pieces of polarized glass (also called substrate) that contain a liquid crystal material between them. A backlight creates light that passes through the first substrate. At the same time, electrical currents cause the liquid crystal molecules to align to allow varying levels of light to pass through to the second substrate and create the colors and images that you see.
Active and Passive Matrix Displays
Most LCD displays use active matrix technology. A thin film transistor (TFT) arranges tiny transistors and capacitors in a matrix on the glass of the display. To address a particular pixel, the proper row is switched on, and then a charge is sent down the correct column. Since all of the other rows that the column intersects are turned off, only the capacitor at the designated pixel receives a charge. The capacitor is able to hold the charge until the next refresh cycle.
The other type of LCD technology is passive matrix. This type of LCD display uses a grid of conductive metal to charge each pixel. Although they are less expensive to produce, passive matrix office monitors are rarely used today due to the technology’s slow response time and imprecise voltage control compared to active matrix technology.
LCD displays offer super sharp pictures and great color. But do the pros outweigh the cons when it comes to LCD TV displays? Before deciding on a thumbs up or thumbs down, you should understand how an LCD display works.
Mechanics of an LCD display
The LCD consists of a large number of pixels, or picture elements, consisting of liquid crystal molecules held between two sets of transparent electrodes.
The liquid crystals react in predictable ways when the electrical charge running between those electrodes is changed — meaning they twist and move in ways that let different amounts (and colors) of light through the crystals. The LCD has a control system that translates your video signals into the proper charges for each electrode. A light source shines through the LCD panel and creates your picture.
When compared to the other type of flat-panel display (plasma), LCDs tend to be found on the smaller size of the spectrum. You’ll rarely find a plasma smart TV smaller than 42 inches, but you can find LCDs at sizes as small as 13 inches.
Benefits of LCD displays
LCD displays have some strong points when it comes to playing video:
Extremely high resolutions: LCDs can easily reach HDTV resolutions (in fact, most LCD displays do). You can find a 1080p-capable LCD display in all but the smallest sizes — while many plasma displays are still 720p.
Excellent color: LCDs offer exceptional reproduction of colors, with the potential for beautifully re-created colors across the spectrum. This differs from other flat-panel displays (such as plasma systems), which often tend to display certain colors inaccurately.
Great picture: The newest and most expensive LCDs use an LED (light emitting diode) instead of a traditional bulb for their light source. These LEDs produce a higher-quality picture because the LED itself emits a more natural (closer to daylight) light than a bulb (which tends to be yellowish, not true white).
Energy efficiency: LCD HDTVs are perhaps the greenest HDTVs. Compared to plasmas, LCD HDTVs use less electricity to run. You can probably expect to use about 30 percent less power for an LCD than for a similar-sized plasma.
PC monitor-capable: Most LCD television displays can also do double-duty as a gaming monitor, plugging directly into any PC with a standard PC video cable.
No burn-in: If you play a lot of video games, watch the stock ticker on MSNBC, or do other things with your display that involve a lot of static content (images that don’t change or move around) on a CRT display, you can end up with those images permanently burned into the phosphors on your LCD screen. Because LCDs use a separate backlight instead of creating their own light with phosphors, they are immune to this problem (plasmas are not, by the way).
Inherently progressive: Unlike direct-view systems, LCDs don’t display their picture using electron guns scanning lines across a screen. Instead, LCDs use millions of tiny transistors that can be individually controlled by the “brains” inside the display. This means that LCDs can easily handle progressive-scan sources, such as progressive-scan DVD and HDTV.
Drawbacks of LCD displays
Consider the following problem areas before you buy an LCD system as your primary display in a home theater:
Slightly more expensive for their size: Inch for viewing inch, LCDs tend to be a bit more expensive than plasma flat-panels.
Poor reproduction of blacks: Compared with direct-view tube displays, LCDs do a poor job of reproducing black images. Darker screen images never show up as true black, but rather as various shades of gray, and actions happening in these darker areas are difficult to discern.
Limited viewing angle: Although they are getting better due to some intensive efforts by manufacturers, LCDs typically have a poor viewing angle. If you are not sitting almost directly in front of the screen, such as 21.5 inch screen pc, or 24 inch screen pc, you don’t get a good picture.
Limited brightness: Because LCDs use a backlight shining through the liquid crystal, most of the light is absorbed. As a result, the LCD displays have lower contrast and are harder to view in a brightly lit room (the picture appears washed out), compared with plasma TVs. LCD TVs with LED backlights do better in this regard.

LED vs. LCD TVs explained: What’s the difference?

Despite having a different acronym, LED TV is just a specific type of LCD TV, which uses a liquid crystal display (LCD) panel to control where light is displayed on your screen. These panels are typically composed of two sheets of polarizing material with a liquid crystal solution between them. When an electric current passes through the liquid, it causes the crystals to align, so that light can (or can’t) pass through. Think of it as a shutter, either allowing light to pass through or blocking it out.
Since both LED and LCD TVs are based around LCD technology, the question remains: what is the difference? Actually, it’s about what the difference was. Older LCD TVs used cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs) to provide lighting, whereas LED LCD TVs used an array of smaller, more efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to illuminate the screen.
Since the technology is better, all LCD TVs now use LED lights and are colloquially considered LED TVs. For those interested, we’ll go deeper into backlighting below, or you can move onto the Local Dimming section.
Backlighting
Three basic illumination forms have been used in LCD TVs: CCFL backlighting, full-array LED backlighting, and LED edge lighting. Each of these illumination technologies is different from one another in important ways. Let’s dig into each.
CCFL Backlighting
CCFL backlighting is an older, now-abandoned form of display technology in which a series of cold cathode lamps sit across the inside of the TV behind the LCD. The lights illuminate the crystals fairly evenly, which means all regions of the picture will have similar brightness levels. This affects some aspects of picture quality, which we discuss in more detail below. Since CCFLs are larger than LED arrays, CCFL-based LCD TVs are thicker than LED-backlit LCD TVs.

What’s the area of Hunger of Hadar whispering and slurping sounds?

Hunger of Hadar has this audio effect:

You open a gateway to the dark between the stars, a region infested with unknown horrors. A 20-foot-radius sphere of blackness and bitter cold appears, centered on a point with range and lasting for the duration. This void is filled with a cacophony of soft whispers and slurping noises that can be heard up to 30 feet away.

Can these sounds be heard 30′ from the sphere (50′ radius), or 30′ from the center point (10′ from the sphere)?

Related: I also asked a separate question about the effect of these sounds.

What’s your take on charging a Ring of Storing with a Wand of Wonder? [closed]

I’m level 4 sorcerer, with a 2 slot Ring of Storing (my DM based the price on the number of slots and thats what I could afford with a loan from another party member), and we just received a Wand of Wonder. I’m sure that plenty of purists are going to say "F* NO!", but I’m interested in how the mechanics would play, if my DM allows it. Could I use it as a filtering device and charge it until I get a spell that my character wants? Could it hold 2 spells or effects, 1 spell, or only spells level 2 and below (all other spells either fail or backfire)?

What’s the type of damage for a multi-typed weapon damage?

Say i play a level 7 Arcane Trickster Rogue with a Shadow Blade equipped which deals 2d8 Psychic damage. In addition I used Absorb Elements with which i absorbed an Ice Mephit’s Frost Breath on me, which would add 1d6 Cold damage to that attack. Lastly I cast Green-Flame-Blade to finally make my attack which would add 1d8 Fire damage. As the Ice Mephit is resistant to Cold but weak to Fire, I get that the additional damage from Absorb Elements would be halved, but Green-Flame-Blade would be doubled. Now to the sneak Attack:

Beginning at 1st level, you know how to strike subtly and exploit a foe’s distraction. Once per turn, you can deal an extra 1d6 damage to one creature you hit with an attack if you have advantage on the attack roll. The attack must use a finesse or a ranged weapon.

As the Sneak attack inherits the weapon attack’s type, how would i calculate the damage for the sneak attack?

  1. Do I choose which type the sneak attack is?
  2. Is it all types at once, and I count the amount of time an element is resisted or is strong against the enemy? (in this case 1. resistance and 1 vulnerability would neutralise and I’d just take the normal result from my sneak attack die)
  3. Does the damage calculation go by whatever type is more beneficial to a) the attacker or b) the defender?