What’s a good comparison of different OSR Systems?

I’m looking to play a retro clone or something that is similar to old style D&D, but with the rules smoothed over a bit.

I’m seeing LOTS of different systems and it’s a bit daunting.

Some attributes I’d like to compare, to give you an example:

  • randomly spawning monsters?
  • random monster attitudes towards the players?
  • random treasure
  • random diseases
  • random etc…
  • inventory management: weight? slots?
  • player reviews
  • popularity / size of community
  • what is the max level / how long to recover from player death
  • are all encounters beatable?
  • how is armor class calculated?
  • are there dungeon turns?
  • light management
  • hex-crawl rules / overworld travel rules
  • reaction rolls
  • number of skills
  • death at 0HP vs stabilization rolls
  • magic system mechanics

Is there a comparison chart that can help me compare lots of different systems?

What’s the use for proficiency with a gaming set?

Compared to other skill/tool proficiencies, being proficient with a gaming set seems horribly underpowered. Especially since there’s even a subdivision into different games.

I expect such games to come up sometimes, to win a McGuffin or gain trust. But the adventure needs to be tailored to it, unless you run some kind of shameful Yu-Gi-Oh ripoff 😛

Is this just a horrible Character building choice, or are there hidden used I’m overlooking?

What’s the best way to incorporate MTG into D&D?

I started playing AD&D when it came out in the seventies. I have all of the 1st edition Core books including Deities & Demigods with Melnibonéan and Cthulhu mythos. I have about 100 Modules as well as some Gamma World and Star Frontiers. I started playing Magic the Gathering in 1993 and have about 15,000 cards. There are a lot of creatures as well as characters that I would like to incorporate into some D&D dungeons, but not exactly sure how to make the transition from Magic’s Attack/Defense to D&D’s AC/HP or specific DAM. Any suggestions where to start, other than just doing a comparison from a MTG creature/character to something from D&D?

What’s the difference between unarmored and adventurer’s clothing?

From the armor table, the only difference I can see between being unarmored and wearing adventurer’s clothing is that the latter imposes a dex cap (+5) while the former does not. Yes, the latter also has the Comfort armor trait, but given that describes armor being sufficiently comfortable that you can rest normally while wearing it, I’d imagine "nothing" is also fairly comfortable.

So what’s the purpose of adventurer’s clothing? Does it have any impact at all on environmental effects? If a monk has a +6 dex modifier, should they just run around in their birthday suits?

Is it only that adventurer’s clothing can have potency runes, while "unarmored" cannot?

What’s the best weapon for disarming?

Just like the title says. I’m working on a funny build based on disarming (typically suboptimal, yes, but this one’ll be hilarious). What’s the best weapon for this character?

I assume it’ll be a two-handed one, for the +4 bonus. Looking at the SRD, the heavy flail and the ranseur both give an extra +2 bonus, but the heavy flail has just slightly better damage and criticals, so that’s what I’m going with for now.

Is there anything better out there?

Select arbitrary single value for GROUP BY: What’s the fastest option?

I have a query that I use to indicate locations in a map where there are overlapping points:

select     min(objectid) as min_objectid,     longitudex,     latitudey,     count(1) as count,     min(shape) as min_shape from     workorders group by     longitudex,     latitudey having     count(1) > 1 

In the mapping software that I use, I need to include columns like objectid and shape. For those columns, it doesn’t matter which of the grouped-by rows the values come from, just as long as there is a value.

Presently, I’m using min() to get an arbitrary value for those columns. However, I don’t know if that’s the fastest option since finding the minimum value would require calculation — and I wonder if that time spent is unnecessary.

What is the fastest option for getting an arbitrary/single value for GROUP BY in an Oracle query?

What’s behind the widespread negative response to Wild Sorcerers, and how can I ensure they’re fun at my table?

I’m just starting to get into D&D 5e. Magic classes in particular fascinate me, and the one that caught my eye the most is the wild sorcerer. Or, rather, the concept did. The mechanics of the design itself seem particularly lackluster when compared to every other magic class I’ve looked at.

After quite a bit of searching, it seems I’m not alone in this observation. All over the place, people insist that wild sorcerers are unbalanced/underwhelming/generally unwanted. But I haven’t really seen any explanations of what exactly makes them this way, compared to other classes.

I’m now looking at attempting to DM a game with a bunch of other newbies, and trying to figure the game out as a group. One of my players will likely want to play a wild sorcerer. I’m interested in seeing how that plays out in RAW, but more importantly, I want the players to have fun.

I’m new and inexperienced. What should I look out for in the Wild Sorcerer when considering balance, or fun? Are there any gaping flaws in practice for the wild sorcerer’s design?

Right now I’m considering using the existing mechanics, but supplementing them with a secondary system of character progression that slowly takes the sorcerer from fearing their magic that’s unpredictable, to having some, but not total, control over it. Basically there’s a chaos level that increases and decreases based on player ability/spell usage. High chaos means more wild surges, low means less. To get the most out of the design, you have to balance the chaos level (in theory).

Note, I’m well-aware that I should probably stick to RAW during the learning phase. But as someone that works in gaming, I’m also aware that mechanics typically function differently in practice than in theory, and so I want to be prepared for any known “in-practice” shortcomings.

It sounds like the main ones are how often a surge happens (GM overhead, chance of anything happening at all), and exactly what happens (more flavor vs more functionality, which is up to what you want from the game). Both answers were solid, but I’m going with Icy’s, since it approached the question more specifically targeting the Wild Sorcerer’s in-practice functionality with examples and edge cases.