Does a Druid in Wild Shape need hands to grapple?

The rules for grappling say “using at least one free hand”, but there are plenty of examples of creatures that grapple without hands–Giant Toad and Octopus, Giant Constrictor Snake, etc., and many of those do it automatically on a successful hit. So what about other creature types? A bear? A giant viper? A shark? Or is this a matter of DM judgment call?

Using Wild Shape to hide (as a parasite) [closed]

So, a question came up in a game recently. Can a Druid with Wild Shape use it to transform into a parasitic animal and thus occupy the same square as the host, as well as smuggle the Druid into some other place? Like how would you run it if a Druid Wild Shape’d into a tapeworm? Could she use that to sneak past some guards inside another person? The general rule is that if they are inside another animal and de-wild shape, they just appear next to the first creature rather than making it explode by resizing inside it, so I am not so much concerned with how the end game would work out, but whether or not it would be allowed, how combat might work, stuff like that. Thoughts?

If a player rolls 33-34 on the wild magic table (maximize damage), what happens if they miss the target on the damaging attack?

On the Wild Magic Sorcerer’s Wild Magic Table, (PHB p.104), getting a roll of 33-34 results in:

Maximize the damage of the next damaging spell you cast within the next minute.

What happens if the sorcerer casts an attack roll spell that deals damage, and misses the target? I am being confused by the term "damaging." Is a "Damaging Spell" a hidden category of spell that can be cast, and thus means casting the spell ends this effect? or does the spell need to apply damage in order to be damaging, and would therefore need to hit for the effect to happen?

What’s behind the widespread negative response to Wild Sorcerers, and how can I ensure they’re fun at my table?

I’m just starting to get into D&D 5e. Magic classes in particular fascinate me, and the one that caught my eye the most is the wild sorcerer. Or, rather, the concept did. The mechanics of the design itself seem particularly lackluster when compared to every other magic class I’ve looked at.

After quite a bit of searching, it seems I’m not alone in this observation. All over the place, people insist that wild sorcerers are unbalanced/underwhelming/generally unwanted. But I haven’t really seen any explanations of what exactly makes them this way, compared to other classes.

I’m now looking at attempting to DM a game with a bunch of other newbies, and trying to figure the game out as a group. One of my players will likely want to play a wild sorcerer. I’m interested in seeing how that plays out in RAW, but more importantly, I want the players to have fun.

I’m new and inexperienced. What should I look out for in the Wild Sorcerer when considering balance, or fun? Are there any gaping flaws in practice for the wild sorcerer’s design?

Right now I’m considering using the existing mechanics, but supplementing them with a secondary system of character progression that slowly takes the sorcerer from fearing their magic that’s unpredictable, to having some, but not total, control over it. Basically there’s a chaos level that increases and decreases based on player ability/spell usage. High chaos means more wild surges, low means less. To get the most out of the design, you have to balance the chaos level (in theory).

Note, I’m well-aware that I should probably stick to RAW during the learning phase. But as someone that works in gaming, I’m also aware that mechanics typically function differently in practice than in theory, and so I want to be prepared for any known “in-practice” shortcomings.

It sounds like the main ones are how often a surge happens (GM overhead, chance of anything happening at all), and exactly what happens (more flavor vs more functionality, which is up to what you want from the game). Both answers were solid, but I’m going with Icy’s, since it approached the question more specifically targeting the Wild Sorcerer’s in-practice functionality with examples and edge cases.

How can a druid keep ahold of an item while using wild shape?

In the interest of making a bouncing ooze (via Cave Druid) that utilizes Leaper’s Libation and a level of Black Powder Vaulter to jump around everywhere, I wanted to use an Akitonian Blade (tiny-sized) in order to boost my acrobatics checks for obvious reasons.

However, I have a set of problems that come with it:

  1. Oozes have no hands. (Solved via Arms of the Marilith)
  2. When I wild shape into an ooze, the blade merges into me, preventing me from obtaining it’s bonuss since I’m not wielding it anymore.

Given that I don’t want to waste actions dropping the Arms of the Marilith, picking them up, and re-equipping them every combat, how can I keep ahold of them while wild shaping?

Do any feats carry over when in Wild Shape?

I’m wondering if any feats might carry over when a druid assumes a Wild Shape. I’m specifically looking at the Alert and Lucky Feats.

PHB p.67 stipulates:

Your game statistics are replaced by the statistics of the beast…

So I would tend to think that that precludes the +5 to Initiative in the Alert Feat, but I thought it would be a good idea to check with you guys.

Best wild shape for my Druid

I am planning on making a Druid as part of a 3 person party in an upcoming game, the other two people are a life based cleric as our tank/healer, and a champion fighter as a dual wielder/archer.

I am going to be a circle of the moon Druid who focuses on casting spells but can still be good at melee. Specifically the form should have at least 10 health, and 10 ac, and the highest damage possible. If the damage is tied, choose the one with the higher health, if the health and damage is tied, choose the one with the higher AC. I am currently thinking about what to use at level 2 (the beast must have a challenge rating of 1 or lower and cannot fly or swim).

What should I use for my wild shape animals?

Can a Wild Magic Barbarian restore a 7th(+) Level Warlock’s spell slots?

In the recently released preview of the Wild Magic Barbarian that will be in Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything (preview here), I noticed the 6th level feature ‘Bolstering Magic’. This feature has two applications. One acts as a Bless-type option, the second one reads:

Roll a d3. The creature [you’re touching] regains one expended spell slot, the level of which equals the number rolled or lower (the creature’s choice). Once a creature receives this benefit, that creature can’t receive it again until after a long rest.

Suppose this effect is used on a Warlock of level 7 or above, and for the sake of argument suppose we rolled a 3 on the d3. All of their spell slots are of spell level 4. What happens?

  • Nothing, the Warlock doesn’t have the right type of spell slot to regain
  • The Warlock has (expended) spell slots of Level 4 and higher, and now has a level 3 spell slot
  • Something else happens, namely …

Does Chill Touch Prevent Druid’s Wild Shape from Recovering Hit Points?

Does the Chill Touch cantrip’s secondary effect prevent a Druid from regaining hit points via Wild Shape?

Chill Touch reads:

… On a hit, the target takes 1d8 necrotic damage, and it can’t regain hit points until the start of your next turn.

Wild Shape:

… When you transform, you assume the beast’s hit points and Hit Dice.

RAW: Is "assume" the same as "regain"?