Do removed parts of a Druid’s Wild Shape form persist after said Druid exits Wild Shape?

A player wanted to use Wild Shape as an unlimited supply of feathers for our ranger to make his own arrows with and it sparked a discussion on whether or not parts of a Druid that are removed from said Druid’s Wild Shape persist after the Druid is no longer in Wild Shape.

I have been unable to find any rules that either allow or disallow this action. Whereas there are specific rules on what happens to gear the druid is wearing, I have found no statement on what happens to removed physical parts of the Wild Shape form.

I have thought of two reasonable solutions:

  1. Removed pieces of Wild Shape form persist indefinitely. This would make a Druid Indistinguishable from a normal creature until knocked out of druid form and would make the party assassin happy as he now has a reliable fresh supply of Giant venomous snake venom to apply to his daggers.

  2. Removed pieces of wild shape form persist until the Druid leaves Wild Shape. This would avoid the issues of unlimited resources, but raise other questions such as whether blood spilled by the Wild Shape also disappears or whether a creature that has “become poisoned for 1 hour” would stop being poisoned when the Druid is knocked out of that shape because the poison has dissipated with his Wild Shape.

Which (if either) of these lines up with the rules? Or does this fall under DM fiat?

Does a Druid in Wild Shape receive the creature’s natural attacks?

I had always assumed this was a no-brainer…the text on Wild Shape clearly says the Druid received the beast’s "game statistics" which would seem to indicate you receive the natural attacks… But a player in my game seems to think it only applies to attributes and things like movement or senses.

Is there a definitive answer on this?

In what ways can a druid’s Wild Shape be detected?

I’m a relative newcomer to D&D 5th Ed. and am playing a druid fond of Wild Shape. I’d like to know in what ways it can be detected by NPCs (or even fellow PCs). It appears that this is a sort of debated subject, as to how and whether Detect Magic works on it or not.

I read through the question, Detecting Wild Shape with a Mythal, but I’ve no idea what a Mythal is. In portions of the question and its answers, there seems to be various interpretations of how Detect Magic might work (or not). It seems to me that the ability is a sort of innate or supernatural ability, and whether it is "magical" or not is somewhat ambiguous.

My reason for asking is that Detect Magic seems to be a relatively low-level spell and thus makes Wild Shape (for espionage, surveillance, scouting, etc.) somewhat less dependable.

In another answer by Neil Slater, this excerpt seems applicable:

…the consensus in groups I have played in … is that Detect Magic is equivalent to "Detect Spells, Spell-like Effects and Enchantments". That is, it will detect spells in progress, spell-like powers of monsters, and permanent enchantments on scrolls, and standard magic weapons. Under that interpretation, will not detect supernatural powers, such as a druid’s Wild Shape…

Is there a more recent consensus on how this mechanic might work?

Finally, Detect Magic aside, in what other ways can a druid’s Wild Shape be detected or nullified?

Transmutation, polymorph, wild shape, and alternate form

The Pathfinder rules are quite clear on what happens when you combine polymorph effects with size-changing effects. Namely, the size-changing effects do not function while a character is under the effects of a polymorph effect. But what about other transmutations that change a character’s physical form?

Examples: Brand, Countless Eyes, etc.

I can see this working in two ways:

  1. If a character is targeted by a transmutation effect, then a polymorph effect, the polymorph effect overrides the transmutation effect. But, if the polymorph effect is first, then the transmutation effect functions normally (by transmutation effect, I am referring to non-size-altering effects.)
  2. Both polymorph effects and transmutation effects alter the base creature, so the order in which spells are cast does not matter, as both are affecting the base creature, not the modified creature.

There is also the possibility that the transmutation effect simply does not function at all while a character is under the effects of a polymorph effect, but I have not seen evidence of that in the rules (where size-alterations are the only specifically mentioned effects that do not function).

Examples:

A druid is the target of a Greater Brand. This spell specifically states that it cannot be removed, even temporarily, unless a Mark of Justice could be removed the same way. This spell might be a specific example that says that in this case, the spell functions even under the effects of a polymorph effect. So, when the druid wild shapes, the brand would still be visible.

But, what about a regular brand spell (not greater)? Would that remain during the effects of a wild shape?

What about Countless Eyes? The druid is covered in eyes, and then wild shapes. Are they now an animal that is covered in eyes? Or does the wild shape override that effect? If they are wild shaped, and they (or someone else) casts Countless Eyes on them, does the spell function normally?

Basically, I am wondering if order of spellcasting matters.

How does resistance/vulnerability/immunity interact with carryover damage after reducing a Polymorphed (or Wild Shaped) form to 0 HP?

A caster casts polymorph on another creature. Let’s say the polymorphed creature has 10 HP in its new form, but takes 30 piercing damage and its current form is reduced to 0 HP. This causes it to revert back to its original form, with 20 more piercing damage that would carry over. However, its original form is resistant to piercing damage.

How much damage would the new form actually take? Would its original form’s resistance to the damage type apply to the carryover damage?

The same question can be extended to the original form having immunity or vulnerability, as the answer would ostensibly use the same logic.


The druid’s Wild Shape ability also works similarly to polymorph in this regard (if you reduce the new form to 0 HP, then any remaining damage carries over to its original form), so I suspect the answer would be similar for a similar question about Wild Shape.

If your wild shaped form has damage resistance and you revert to your normal form, does your normal form take the halved damage?

Let’s say we had a druid with the Circle of the Moon archetype. They can use their wild shape feature to turn into an elemental as per their Elemental Wild Shape feature (PHB, p. 69):

Elemental Wild Shape
At 10th level, you can expend two uses of Wild Shape at the same time to transform into an air elemental, an earth elemental, a fire elemental, or a water elemental.

Those elemental creatures all have resistance to nonmagical bludgeoning, piercing and slashing damage, and some forms have other damage resistances too. Let’s say your elemental form was on 5 HP and you took 20 nonmagical slashing damage. Your elemental form would halve that damage to 10 damage. This exceeds the total HP the elemental form was on, and so you would revert back to your normal form, as per wild shape (PHB, p. 67):

… if you revert as a result of dropping to 0 hit points, any excess damage carries over to your normal form. For example, if you take 10 damage in animal form and have only 1 hit point left, you revert and take 9 damage.

Let’s assume that your normal form has no damage resistances. Does your normal form really take just 5 slashing damage, even though your normal form isn’t resistant to slashing damage, or would your normal form take 10 damage, since that’s what it would have been if it wasn’t halved by a resistance that no longer applies to your reverted form? Intuitively I think the normal form should take 5 damage, but the below related question’s answers (even through it’s the opposite scenario) would imply that it would take 10 damage.


Related (but the other way around, since that Q&A is talking about the normal form having the resistance, whereas I’m asking about the wild shaped form having the resistance): How does resistance/vulnerability/immunity interact with carryover damage after reducing Polymorphed (or Wild Shaped) form to 0 HP?

Can one Wild Shape into a Swarm?

My gut feeling is that wildshaping into a swarm is not RAI, but I’ve had such feelings at times and been wrong, so it feels worth asking.

When it comes to RAW, so far I cannot find anything that says you could not.

At 4th level, a druid gains the ability to turn herself into any Small or Medium animal and back again once per day. Her options for new forms include all creatures with the animal type.

Wild Shape includes any and all creatures of the Animal type, and while swarms are their own subtype, they are a subtype of Animal, which should be inclusive of the “parent type”, right? Or is my programmer’s thinking messing this up?

One could say that a swarm is many creatures, but…

Swarm Subtype: A swarm is a collection of Fine, Diminutive, or Tiny creatures that acts as a single creature.

The best I can come up with to counter this is that it says “acts as” and not “is a”.

Finally, there’s the issue of size for lower level druids, but my question is not restricted to early levels. So, if the druid can turn into fine or tiny creatures, are swarms okay?

Do Hidden Houses Wild Talent feats have prerequisites?

Complete Psionic lists some extra feats which market themselves as alternative versions of Wild Talent. It says that Talaire humans need to take one as their bonus feat, but it doesn’t seem to say whether or not anyone else can take them. The regular Wild Talent feat has no prerequisites, so it would make sense in that way, but it seems somewhat unclear, since the book explicitly calls them feats, but then doesn’t have the regular information for them that feats normally have.

But what seems to be implied is that, for example, despite the feat’s name implying a connection to the human House Adon, a pegasus could take the Wild Talent (Adon) feat and gain all its benefits?

Can a Wild Magic sorcerer use Tides of Chaos against the wild magic effect immediately after rolling on the Wild Magic Surge table to recharge it?

My player’s character, a 4th-level Wild Magic sorcerer, cast magic missile as a 2nd-level spell after having previously used Tides of Chaos. Since she had used Tides of Chaos, I had her roll on the Wild Magic Surge table to recharge the feature. She rolled a 07, the dreaded self-fireball. As her character had only 4 HP left, and failed his Dexterity saving throw, he instantly died a spectacular death.

In retrospect, could she have potentially saved her character from instant death by using Tides of Chaos again on the Dexterity saving throw against fireball?

My understanding of the rules was that Tides of Chaos recharges after the wild magic surge is resolved. However, I recently noticed it says that you get it back after rolling on the Wild Magic Surge table, which is arguably complete before the fireball goes off.

Is there any clear rule about this, or is it up to the DM’s judgment?