How does Wish work with spells that interact with material components?

How does wish work with spells that interact with material components?

For example, how does wish work with a spell like leomund’s secret chest? Do an exquisite chest and small chest just appear with the wish? Or do you need them?

Wish says it doesn’t need any expensive components to cast, but things are a bit unclear here.

Can a Wish produce a paradox?

I have an idea for a cool chaotic BBEG. His/her ultimate goal is to completely destroy existence.

Could a Wish be cast in such a way as to create a paradox, allowing me to destroy existence? Or does the wish “altering reality” part of the spell indicate that it cannot produce a paradox?

For example, “I wish I was never born”?

Should I allow a player to use wish to change a cantrips function?

Is it in any way gamebreaking, if I let a player use his wish to change a function of the green flame cantrip?

As a group of long year friends, we ruled that we always speak about the things the DM rules and talk about if it was right or acceptable for the players. I would never let the player speak his wish and then surprise him with an unforeseen bad consequence. We ruled that we talk about the wish and what would probably happen, if someone wishes that.

I just don’t know if it’s gamebreaking, if we allow it.

For example the green flame blade. The player wishes that the damage for the second target can also be dealt to the first target without the need of a second target in the first place. That means double damage output for a single target. But in the end the damage stays the same, except that it hits one instead of 2 targets.

He could word it like: I wish that all the power of my green blade spell directs only to a single target. But like I said I always talk with the player and listen to their view on this subject. So I don’t care about the wording. We allow it or we don’t.

Does resurrecting a creature killed by the disintegrate spell (or similar) with wish trigger the non-spell replicating penalties of the wish spell?

The first thing that causes me to question this, is the general design of it, which is more of a RAI assessment. From what I can tell, wish’s non-spell replicating punishment is meant to be a limit and punishment to keep players from breaking the game with repeated and frequent uses of wish to reshape the world and break every other rule of the game with a solid mechanical effect that doesn’t put the whole weight of that limitation on the GM’s shoulders.

From this perspective, using wish to resurrect someone killed by a spell that explicitly tells them that they have to use wish (or another 9th level resurrection spell) to resurrect someone is a fully intended system in the game, and thus should not be subjected to wish’s punishment for "trying to break the game"

The RAW argument for the resurrection not triggering the punishment is that, if the person has died within the last 10 days, the spell Reincarnate only requires you touch a piece of them (resurrection does not have the "piece of them" option), which the dust left behind by disintegrate could be argued to be, and the a new body is generated for them. Wish was used to replicate the spell. Therefore you are meeting the requirements of disintegrate (wish) and the requirements of the non-punishing wish (replicating a spell) and the requirements of Reincarnate (touching a piece of the body). So you should not have a chance to lose wish.

The argument for it not working is pretty straight forward. You are casting wish, invoking the text of the disintegrate spell, not replicating a spell of level 8 or less.

Also, this could seem like it is stepping on the toes of True resurrection. However True resurrection has a much longer timeframe, does not change the character’s race, and does not require the party to pick up all the dust if they can’t cast wish before a strong gust of wind picks up. It also only works to counteract disintegrate or other spells with the same effect in the same way that true resurrection does, it does not replace other reasons that true resurrection could be necessary, such as the body being taken out of the party’s reach.

Reincarnate(Relevant):

You touch a dead Humanoid or a piece of a dead Humanoid. Provided that the creature has been dead no longer than 10 days, the spell forms a new adult body for it and then calls the soul to enter that body. If the target’s soul isn’t free or willing to do so, the spell fails.

Wish(Relevant):

The stress of casting this spell to produce any effect other than duplicating another spell weakens you. After enduring that stress, each time you cast a spell until you finish a long rest, you take 1d10 necrotic damage per level of that spell. This damage can’t be reduced or prevented in any way. In addition, your Strength drops to 3, if it isn’t 3 or lower already, for 2d4 days. For each of those days that you spend resting and doing nothing more than light activity, your remaining recovery time decreases by 2 days. Finally, there is a 33 percent chance that you are unable to cast wish ever again if you suffer this stress.

Disintegrate (Relevant):

A disintegrated creature and everything it is wearing and carrying, except Magic Items, are reduced to a pile of fine gray dust. The creature can be restored to life only by means of a True Resurrection or a wish spell.

Personally, if this came up in play, I would not include wish’s punishment due to the first paragraph, however with the benefit of foresight, I am seeking a more informed answer.

Can Fraz-Urb’Luu make use of a Wish spell from his one-minute Simulacrum (‘in-Lair’ action)?

As a demon Lord, Fraz-Urb’Luu has many powers. Specifically he can generate a Simulacrum of anyone in his ‘lair’ – and they last for about ten seconds, give or take. Specially:

Fraz-Urb’luu chooses one humanoid within the lair and instantly creates a simulacrum of that creature (as if created with the simulacrum spell). This simulacrum obeys Fraz-Urb’luu’s commands and is destroyed on the next initiative count 20. – Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes pg. 146.

How much time does Fraz-Urb’luu have with this simulacrum? Let us assume he has some kind of 17th level caster on hand (possibly Petrified or Imprisoned) – and this humanoid happens to be a caster that has Wish in their memory-repitoire (i.e. a wizard or bard with a Magic Secret). Possible time-flow in bullet-point format:

  • Fraz-Urb’luu must explain to his newly minted simulacrum-creature what it wants it to do. If it wants that illusion-person to cast Wish, this demon lord must explain / include wording of the spell. Not sure how many move-actions this would be. This lord does have telepathy (one of his ‘languages’), which might help.

  • The creature must cast the spell, this is probably one move-action.

  • The creature must include anything it wants with the spell. This would include the full wording of this Wish as indicated by their master Demon Lord creator just moments ago. This may not count as a second move action (?), but it would still require the (re)-wording of the entire phrase once more. Any extensively worded wish will obviously not fit in this time-frame.

How much time do they have together? What RAW exists around the timing, sum total, including this "next initiative count of 20"?


Question: How much time will the Great Demon Lord Fraz-Urb’luu have with his Lair-based Simulacrum from the moment of this casting & creation of his duplication-creature to the end of that creature’s life at the end of the next round?


Reason For Asking: In my campaign world this Demon Lord would like to have the ability to cast Wish (and other spells) in his ‘home’ or lair via this clever mechanic. He also has 26 intelligence and 24 wisdom – he would be intelligent enough to figure out how to do this. This mechanic would be valuable not just for defending himself from brazen adventurers &/or unhappy demon-lords but is also excellent for entertainment &/or creative purposes. Casting a single limitless Wish every second round would be a very useful tool to have.

Edit: Other creatures have a similar mechanic, a DM-option allows this for certain hags:

A powerful sea hag might (?) have the following additional lair actions:

The hag chooses one humanoid within the lair and instantly creates a simulacrum of that creature (as if created with th esimulacrum spell). This hideous simulacrum is formed out of seaweed, slime, half-eaten fish and other garbage, but still generally resembles the creature it is imitating. This simulacrum obeys the hag’s commands and is destroyed on initiate count o20 on the next round. – Volo’s Guide To Monsters, pg. 60.

What spells with material costs or permanent effects could the Warlock: The Genie’s Limited Wish ability apply to?

I’m looking for ways to take the most advantage of this new ability from the upcoming Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything:

You entreat your patron to grant you a small wish. As an action, you can speak your desire to your Genie’s Vessel, requesting the effect of one spell that is 6th level or lower and has a casting time of 1 action. The spell can be from any class’s spell list, and you don’t need to meet the requirements in that spell, including costly components; the spell simply takes effect as part of this action. Once you use this feature, you can’t use it again until you finish 1d4 long rests.

Most of the spells with material costs or permanent/"until dispelled" effects I’ve come across either have a cast time longer than 1 action, or are level 7 or higher. So far the only spells I’ve found are Revivify and Continual Flame. What else am I missing?

Can you avoid the stress penalty of Wish by using Astral Projection?

The wish spell is likely the most powerful and risky spells in Dungeons and Dragons. However, using it to do anything other that duplicate spells carries stress (and potentially losing the spell forever). Below I have quoted the relevant information:

The stress of casting this spell to produce any effect other than duplicating another spell weakens you. After enduring that stress, each time you cast a spell until you finish a long rest, you take 1d10 necrotic damage per level of that spell. This damage can’t be reduced or prevented in any way. In addition, your Strength drops to 3, if it isn’t 3 or lower already, for 2d4 days. For each of those days that you spend resting and doing nothing more than light activity, your remaining recovery time decreases by 2 days. Finally, there is a 33 percent chance that you are unable to cast wish ever again if you suffer this stress.

However, I want do know if these risks carry over to your mortal form, if you were under the effects of astral projection. Below I have quoted the relevant information:

Your astral body resembles your mortal form in almost every way, replicating your game statistics and possessions.

Your astral form is a separate incarnation. Any damage or other effects that apply to it have no effect on your physical body, nor do they persist when you return to it.

So would casting wish while under astral projection subject your body to stress and possibility of losing the spell wish, after astral projection has ended?