When using the evocation wizard’s Sculpt Spells, can you protect fewer creatures than the maximum you are allowed?

The Evocation Wizard’s Sculpt Spell ability allows the wizard to protect some creatures from their own evocation spells:

When you cast an Evocation spell that affects other creatures that you can see, you can choose a number of them equal to 1 + the spell’s level. The chosen creatures automatically succeed on their Saving Throws against the spell, and they take no damage if they would normally take half damage on a successful save.

Does the number of chosen creatures need to be exactly equal to 1 + the spell’s level, or can it be lower?

For example, if an evocation wizard casts Fireball, can they choose 1, 2, or 3 creatures to be protected from the spell, or do they need to select either zero or exactly 4 creatures?

How powerful can a 20th-level Wizard make a 1st-level Fighter without allowing him to realize it is the Wizard’s doing?

A 20th level Wizard makes a bet with another 20th level Wizard – he has to make his grandson succeed on a difficult mission. Without allowing his grandson (a first level Fighter) or his grandson’s compatriots (a first level Rogue, Bard, and Druid) to realize that the Wizard is secretly aiding them, or doing anything to defeat their foes directly, or helping anyone but his grandson (these are all terms of the bet).

To clarify –

  • This Wizard can cast spells on his grandson, only. He can’t Dominate the monsters or Disintegrate locked doors.
  • His grandson has to defeat the challenges (the Wizard can’t even weaken them).
  • Neither his grandson, or any of his party members, can realize or even suspect that someone is aiding them.

Luckily the grandson and his entire party not only lack Spellcraft but also Knowledge: Arcana. However they don’t lack basic induction – suddenly being able to fly or shoot fireballs is likely to raise their suspicion. A magic sword left leaning casually against a door would certainly count as a fail.

So given this situation, with a level 20 Wizard who is unafraid to spend resources to win this bet with his buddy (xp, magic items, scrolls, favours) what can he do to make his grandson’s party succeed at an adventure that may have CR 5-6 encounters or worse?

For the sake of this example, assume the wizard has access to whatever feats, spells, or wealth he needs to achieve this difficult task – he’s using optimization tricks to rebuild or has his own time-slowed demiplane or whatever, he’s a Tricky Wizard and not just a fireball-slinger.

What are the consequences if wizards can cast unprepared spells from their spellbooks?

It’s a staple of the fantasy genre: faced with an obstacle the barbarian can’t punch his way through, the wizard flips through his spellbook until he finds the perfect spell. He reaches into his component pouch, withdrawing—somehow—exactly what he needs, then casts a powerful spell, surprising the heroes and allowing them to continue on.

Wizards don’t get to do that in 5e. They prepare so many spells per day out of their spellbook, and unless the other spells within are tagged ritual, they don’t get to see use until after the next long rest.

I want to house-rule that a wizard can cast unprepared spells from their book in the absence of exigent conditions. If I have time and space to crack out my spellbook, being disallowed from mage armor, disguise self, or jump without [8 minus sleep] hours of study feels arbitrary. What about the game changes, especially balance-wise, if wizards are allowed to cast unprepared spells from their spellbooks?

Note: this would be different from [ritual] spell casting from the spell book. In this proposed scheme, casting an unprepared spell would still require slots.

Can the School of Conjuration wizard’s Minor Conjuration feature be used to summon rare, expensive, and/or consumable spell components?

Can the School of Conjuration wizard’s Minor Conjuration feature (PHB, p. 116) be used to summon rare, expensive, and/or consumable spell components?

It seems to fit within the scope of the feature in a rules-as-written manner, and I am inclined to allow it – but not having fully experienced the dynamics of higher level play where it might come more strongly into play, I have some uncertainty.

Can the sorcerer’s Twinned Spell metamagic and the Enchantment wizard’s Split Enchantment feature be used at the same time?

The Twinned Spell option for the sorcerer’s Metamagic feature says (PHB, p. 102):

When you cast a spell that targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in range with the same spell (1 sorcery point if the spell is a cantrip).

To be eligible, a spell must be incapable of targeting more than one creature at the spell’s current level. For example, magic missile and scorching ray aren’t eligible, but ray of frost and chromatic orb are.

Similarly, the School of Enchantment wizard’s Split Enchantment feature says (PHB, p. 117):

Starting at 10th level, when you cast an enchantment spell of 1st level or higher that targets only one creature, you can have it target a second creature.

If a character with access to both Twinned Spell and Split Enchantment casts a spell that fulfills the requirements for both, can both features be used at the same time?

Can the Chronurgy Wizard’s Chronal Shift ability be used when a creature passes a saving throw with Legendary Resistance?

From Explorer’s Guide to Wildemount, the Chronurgy Wizard’s Chronal Shift ability says:

You can magically exert limited control over the flow of time around a creature. As a reaction, after you or a creature you can see within 30 feet of you makes an attack roll, an ability check, or a saving throw, you can force the creature to reroll. You make this decision after you see whether the roll succeeds or fails. The target must use the result of the second roll.

Using the adult red dragon as an example, Legendary Resistance reads:

If the dragon fails a saving throw, it can choose to succeed instead.

Specifically, here is the scenario:

  1. Wizard casts saving throw spell on Red Dragon
  2. Red Dragon rolls the saving throw and fails
  3. Red Dragon expends one use of legendary resistance to succeed on the saving throw
  4. Wizard uses their reaction to use Chronal Shift to force the dragon to reroll the saving throw
  5. Red Dragon rerolls the saving throw and fails
  6. Red Dragon expends a second use of legendary resistance to succeed the saving throw

In particular, is step 4 of this scenario a valid use of the Chronurgy Wizard’s Chronal Shift ability?


For transparency, this question is a rewrite of this closed question, having this meta post about its closure. In response, I made this meta post that is more generally concerned with re-asking questions that were closed per our dont guess the system policy. Please avoid any meta discussion on this post, instead relegating it to the relevant meta posts.

Chronurgist Wizard’s Chronal Shift at advantage/disadvantage [duplicate]

During my session a player come under the effects of the Dominate Monster spell during a combat. The player, rolled at advantage as written in the spells description, but failed the Wisdom DC both times. The Chronurgist Wizard used his Chronal Shift to reroll as a reaction, but we debated if the roll should be at advantage or not.

I can’t find anything online that would contradict other wise, and the closest thing I can find from the PHB states:

”When you have advantage or disadvantage and ”something in the game”, such as the halfling’s Lucky trait, lets you reroll the d20, you can reroll only one of the dice”

So, how would Chronal Shift be applied in this instance? Would the played roll again at advantage, or would they roll a further 1d20? I personally made the ruling as it being 1d20.

Does Pathfinder 2e Playtest fix the “linear fighters, quadratic wizards” problem?

It is generally accepted that a reasonably optimized DnD 3.5e wizard will wipe the floor with even a well optimized DnD 3.5e fighter by high levels, often known as “linear fighters, quadratic wizards”. Pathfinder 1e removed or nerfed a few of the easiest tricks for this (e.g. polymorph) but probably actually makes the problem worse.

Is there any evidence from the Pathfinder 2e playtest materials currently available that there is any serious attempt to fix this issue, or the more general issue of class balance?