Google Tag Assistant Difficult to fire checkout-tag + What do the words under Summary represent?

I wanted to fire my Facebook Pixel for Initiate Checkouts, however I noticed that I have 2 checkouts that are being loaded with exactly the same variables and data layer. This causes the Pixel to fire twice which I do not want. I don’t really know how you can call the words below summary and what it exactly refers to (I think it is parts of the website that is being loaded) but here is a picture:

enter image description here

So my questions are:

  1. What exactly are checkoutOption, Window Loaded, DOM Ready, checkout, etc.?
  2. Is there a possibility to change or remove them completely? (In my case I would like to remove the double checkout)
  3. What is the best way for me to fire the pixel only once?

Is it possible to stop Google from abbreviating words in search results?

I think that google is abbreviating the word ‘Company’ to ‘Co.’ in search results. If you search for ‘Pop Trading Company’, one of the sitelinks it produces under the main result is for the webshop, and it uses the title ‘Pop Trading Co.’.

Unless I have missed something, no where on the main website (https://poptradingcompany.com/) or webshop (https://webshop.poptradingcompany.com/) is Company shortened to Co.

I have tried Screaming Frog to crawl the site, and explored Search Console for an answer, but have so far been unable. Is there a way to get a handle on this?

Does Divine Word’s Killing Effect Come Before or After the Banishing Effect (For Fiends)

This question is stated right in the title.

In this case, a cleric might cast Divine Word with a fiend with 20 or less HP in the area, and the fiend can hear the cleric.

As we all know, if a fiend fails its save against Divine Word is banished to its home plane. However, all creatures with 20 HP or less is killed instantly. Would, say, a demon that failed its save while under 20 HP be killed first, or sent to the Abyss, then killed there? Same thing with devils, night hags, rakshasas, yugoloths, et cetera. The yugoloth home plane is Gehenna, for specifics.

Can you make an unwilling creature willing? In other words, what defines “willing”?

Going through the spells, I see the phrase “Willing creature” used to determine who you can cast some spells on. I don’t ever see a proper definition of what a willing creature is, but I would assume that it would go something like if you asked them “Can I perform this spell on you” they would answer yes. Is there a more formal definition of what makes a target willing in 5e?

What are the ways I could make an otherwise unwilling creature willing? Suggestion spells, for instance, should probably work but what other options do I have?

In D&D 5e, do most wands no longer require command words?

In the section on magic items in the DMG, under Activating a Magic Item, it states:

Activating some magic items requires a user to do something in particular, such as holding the item and uttering a command word, reading the item if it is a scroll, or drinking it if it is a potion. The description of each item category or individual item details how an item is activated.

Further down, under Spells in the same section, it states:

Some magic items allow the user to cast a spell from the item, often by expending charges from it. The spell is cast at the lowest possible spell and caster level, doesn’t expend any of the user’s spell slots, and requires no components [emphasis mine] unless the item’s description says otherwise.

Note this emphasized text does not say material components, just components. That would suggest verbal and somatic components as well as material.

The general description of wands says nothing about command words, either:

A magic wand is about 15 inches long and crafted of metal, bone, or wood. It is tipped with metal, crystal, stone, or some other material.

Further, some wand descriptions specifically mention a command word. For example, the wand of enemy detection says:

This wand has 7 charges. While holding it, you can use an action and expend 1 charge to speak its command word [emphasis mine]. For the next minute, you know the direction of the nearest creature hostile to you . . .

So going by the tenet that in 5e, the specific overrides the general, all this would suggest wands no longer need a command word to function, unless otherwise stated. But this seems like a really strange change to make from previous editions, and I’ve scoured both the rest of the rules and the web to see if I missed something.

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Does the verbal component for spellcasting have to be words?

To make a long story short: for my first D&D campaign, I want to create a warlock that had to give up her voice as a part of her deal with her Patron.

As such, she is incapable of speaking, but she can still produce sounds with her mouth. I was wondering if that would incapacitate her from casting spells with a Verbal component.

Do spells needs a specific phrase to be cast, or does gibberish work?

How to remove any words containing two adjacent characters with different cases?

I have a list of permutations of ABCabc and I want to remove any permutations with two adjacent characters with different cases (uppercase and lowercase).

For example,

  • ABCcab is kept.
  • ABCacb must be removed because Ca contains two adjacent characters with different cases.
  • AbBcaC must be removed as well.

Attempt

Here is my attempt but without filtering.

Select[StringJoin /@ Permutations[Characters@"ABCabc"],....]