Would the Gust spell be able to move someone under the effect of the Levitate spell?

I am playing an air genasi storm sorcerer. Air genasi have the Mingle with the Wind racial trait, which lets them cast the levitate spell once per long rest (with no material components).

The description of the levitate spell says:

One creature or object of your choice that you can see within range rises vertically, up to 20 feet, and remains suspended there for the duration. The spell can levitate a target that weighs up to 500 pounds. An unwilling creature that succeeds on a Constitution saving throw is unaffected.

The target can move only by pushing or pulling against a fixed object or surface within reach (such as a wall or a ceiling), which allows it to move as if it were climbing. You can change the target’s altitude by up to 20 feet in either direction on your turn. If you are the target, you can move up or down as part of your move. Otherwise, you can use your action to move the target, which must remain within the spell’s range.

The description of gust states:

You seize the air and compel it to create one of the following effects at a point you can see within range:

  • One Medium or smaller creature that you choose must succeed on a Strength saving throw or be pushed up to 5 feet away from you.

  • You create a small blast of air capable of moving one object that is neither held nor carried and that weighs no more than 5 pounds. The object is pushed up to 10 feet away from you. It isn’t pushed with enough force to cause damage.

  • You create a harmless sensory affect using air, such as causing leaves to rustle, wind to slam shutters shut, or your clothing to ripple in a breeze.

I wanted to use the gust cantrip to move myself 5 feet in a direction, but my GM said it wouldn’t work, as levitate only allows the target to move by physical means as the spell states, and I couldn’t cast gust to target myself anyways.

I didn’t argue at the time, but having reread the spells, I’m not sure why it wouldn’t work.

Is it possible to cast levitate on yourself, then use gust to move yourself 5 feet?

Would a bat familiar have a passive perception of 16 in most cases?

In its stat block a bat is shown to have a passive perception of 11; the standard 10 plus wisdom. However, the bats ability Echolocation states that it "can’t use its blindsight while deafened", which heavily implies that the bat relies on hearing for detection. This married with its other ability Keen Hearing which says that a bat has "advantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on hearing" and the knowledge that advantage on perception checks also translates to a +5 to passive perception makes me think that barring special cases (such as perception checks that rely on detecting a certain smell), a bat should be treated as having a passive perception of 16.

Is this correct, or is there a reason a bats perception would stay at 11?

On a D20 roll a +1 modifier equals +5%. What percentage would +1 add to 2D10, 3D10 and 4D10?

I have been reading about replacing the D20 in Dnd with 3D6.

One of the criticisms was that modifiers are exaggerated when you use 3D6, with some people saying a +1 modifier acts more like a +10% modifier.

What would be the percentage modifier of a +1 modifier on various numbers of D10 rolls and how would you calculate that?

How long would you say it would take to break through this trap?

Here is the description of the trap. I removed module specific details to avoid spoilers.

The stone walls of this corridor are carved to resemble a stack of bamboo-like logs. The passage slopes down from a single door on its western leg, the lintel of which has been crafted to represent a stylized cavern entrance.

If the trap triggers, several of the logs swing out from either wall and buffet the party. Once they swing out, the stone logs don’t swing back and thus effectively block the passage, since they bar the way from ceiling to floor with only a 6-inch gap remaining between the logs.

I don’t want it to be impenetrable. How would you rule PCs breaking through?

Why would I use Scorching Ray?

I have a level 3 light domain cleric. I have both the 1st level spell Guiding Bolt and the 2nd level spell Scorching Ray.

When I use a 2nd level spell slot with Guiding Bolt the damage is 5d6 and attacks against the target have advantage for a round, while Scorching Ray with a 2nd level spel slot is 6d6 damage, but you have to roll three times for each ray (which is 2d6) and it’s rare for all three attacks to succeed.

What are the pros & cons of Scorching Ray? Why would I want to use it instead of Guiding Bolt?

When or why would someone use a programming language (Swift, Java, C++, Rust etc…) over an engine like Unity?

Everytime I’ve read about people asking whether they should write their game in C++ or Unity, Unity is usually the default answer, unless they want to go through the hassle of creating an engine by themselves when Unity already does everything for you. If that’s the case is there ever a case where writing a game in C++, Java, Rust etc… is better than using Unity? If so what are these cases?

What would cause cron jobs to fail? WordPress site unresponsive after migration

After a server migration, on a custom-configured server, a large WordPress site is becoming unresponsive once moderate traffic is pointed at it.

There seems to be no seemingly apparent reason for this, as server specs are very much sufficient. One clue is cron jobs are not running. Refreshing pages will not trigger them to run, and they report as "running now" or are scheduled for -40+ years ago (aka, to force them to run now)

However, this fixes it, in wp-config: define(‘ALTERNATE_WP_CRON’, true);

But, why? I feel like this is a symptom of what is wrong with the migrated website, as it does not function at all once it receives traffic (20+ second loading, and/or unresponsive). CPU load/etc, is withing "normal-high" range, aka normal. It just, seemingly dies. Disabling/enabling cache and cloudflare doesn’t change anyhting. The original site, same settings, functions great.

What would cause cron jobs to fail and a server to not handle traffic after a migration to a freshly configured server?

Does a force field absorb hit point damage from an attack that would only deplete stamina points?

In Starfinder, personal force fields grant temporary hit points to the user and fast heal those temporary hit points every round for a finite number of rounds. My question is whether the force field provides any protection at all from an attack that would only deplete the target’s stamina points?

If the force field itself had a number of hit points that it would absorb before damage was applied to the user (like a ship’s shields), this would be a simple question–damage would be applied first to the force field and extra over that round’s allotment would be applied to the user’s stamina points and then hit points. But the description of the force field states that it grants temporary hit points to the user and if the user is a player character then they do not lose hit points (temporary or otherwise) until their stamina points are depleted. It seems to me that, rules as written, force fields do not protect stamina points, but since attacks that reduce stamina points do in fact hit the character, a force field should protect them. Am I reading the rules right or am I missing something? Has Paizo clarified this at all?