What happens if you become frightened of yourself?

You might be wondering how this could happen apart from a contrived scenario of casting a spell like cause fear on yourself (which is technically allowed). Turns out, it can happen by interacting with the local wildlife of Icewind Dale.

The Crag Cat has this ability:

Spell Turning. The cat has advantage on saving throws against any spell that targets only the cat (not an area). If the cat’s saving throw succeeds and the spell is of 7th level or lower, the spell has no effect on the cat and instead targets the caster.

So I cast cause fear on a Crag Cat, it passes the save, and then I fail on my save. I become the target of my own cause fear, which means I am now frightened of myself.

The frightened condition says:

  • A frightened creature has disadvantage on ability checks and attack rolls while the source of its fear is within line of sight.
  • The creature can’t willingly move closer to the source of its fear.

Do either of these conditions apply in some way while I am frightened of myself?

You might be thinking, "why not ust drop concentration and end the effect?" Right, that would work, if the caster thought to do that. When this scenario played out in my game, the player character who was frightened of himself was so worked up about being frightened of himself he didn’t even think to drop concentration, which I thought was a great narrative expression of the effect. I ruled on the fly that he used all of his movement on his turn to run about wildly, trying to get away from himself, opting to make a quick ruling without spending much time thinking to preserve the tension of the situation. Now that I have had time to think about it, I’m not sure what the correct ruling would be.

Why is burying yourself not such a great plan?

One of my player is a clever guy. At night when the others are putting the camp together he digs a hole big enough for himself (between 3-4 feet deep) and asks someone to cover his body with dirt; he then uses a straw to breath. His idea is to avoid ambush at night.

The first time I was baffled by this idea and had no response. After a couple of nights I started challenging his strategy. I identified a couple of potential complications but he was able to answer everything I offered.

  • Sleeping under 3 feet of dirt at night would be terribly cold (But I have a bedroll which is warm enough
  • You wouldn’t sleep comfortably and be sore in the morning (No specific rules for sleeping in armor I can use as a reference)
  • Breathing through a straw requires keeping your mouth closed and doing so while you’re sleeping is impossible (I’m an elf and when I’m in trance I’m not asleep so I can keep my mouth shut)

    He has no intention of quickly being able to help the rest of the party if they get attacked, so escaping his hole is not something I can use against him (I tried).

    So far the problem has not transpired out-of-game. I’m annoyed because he’s obviously trolling but the other members of the group don’t mind his selfishness (he doesn’t get XP or loot from attacks at night).

Am I wrong to think that this is not such a great plan? I can’t think of any reason or mechanics to point out the flaws of his plan.

I don’t mind him doing it. I just think I’m not emulating the consequences properly because it’s an obviously stupid decision.

Should you let yourself ssh into every machine in your network?

I am wondering how you should setup your network (AWS) so you can debug different things that might occur. Obviously there’s logging, but it seems at some point you might require SSHing into the actual machine of interest and checking around. If this is the case, it seems you would need to open up port 22 on every machine in the network. To make it secure, I would only allow bastion host to connect to my IP address, and then every other machine only allows connections from the bastion host on the internal network. Is this considered bad practice? If so, what is the right way to go about this situation?

What are the mechanics for hiding something that is not yourself?

How can a cleric hide a living body? asked for cleric spells that would keep the body of an unconscious but live comrade unseen.

I considered Pass without Trace, since it targets creatures with no requirement that the creatures be conscious, but then realized that if the companion was unconscious, it could not make a Stealth check, so a +10 bonus to no roll is still no roll.

That got me thinking of the larger issue of hiding things that don’t get their own checks. Hiding a conscious character (as in preparing an ambush) would be the Help action, providing advantage on the other character’s Stealth roll. But what would you do to represent a character trying to hide something that didn’t get its own rolls?

  1. Is there an established mechanism for this? (I haven’t found any). Looking for something would be a Perception or Investigation, but what would this be contested against?

  2. I am thinking this would be a Survival check, possibly Sleight of Hand for anything small enough to fit in one hand but that might presuppose active observation while trying to hide it. Thoughts?

  3. What sort of conditions would be sufficient for giving the character hiding something a circumstances bonus (advantage)? One would be abundant time…so how long?

Can you cast Mirror Image twice on successive turns and have 6 duplicates of yourself instead of 3?

Mirror image (PHB, pg. 260) is a spell that has a casting time of 1 action, and a duration of 1 minute. My question is, can you cast Mirror image twice on successive turns, gaining 6 images by turn 2?

Sample Turns:

Turn 1: Mirror Image (3 images)

Turn 2: Mirror Image again (6 images, with 3 of them lasting 1 turn less)

Since Mirror Image doesn’t require concentration, there should be no interference between the 2 casts in terms of concentration. I know that this could be up to DM Fiat, but I was wondering if there was a proper interpretation of the printed rules for this situation.

Can you throw yourself off your mount?

The rules for normal (“safe”) dismounting are as follows :

Once during your move, you can […] dismount. Doing so costs an amount of movement equal to half your speed.

Some external factors might forcefully dismount you :

If an effect moves your mount against its will while you’re on it, you must succeed on a DC 10 Dexterity saving throw or fall off the mount, landing prone in a space within 5 feet of it. If you’re knocked prone while mounted, you must make the same saving throw. If your mount is knocked prone, you can use your reaction to dismount it as it falls and land on your feet. Otherwise, you are dismounted and fall prone in a space within 5 feet it.

But what if you don’t want to “safely” dismount (landing up), and instead, throw yourself off your mount, landing prone ? Can you even do such a thing – either via the above Dexterity Saving Throw (where failure is the desired outcome), or through an Acrobatics/Athletics check, etc. ? More so, would it cause damage to brutally throw yourself off a moving mount ?

The purpose of this (as I’m sure you will ask!) is for someone with the Athlete feat (or 6 levels in Way of the Drunken Master Monk) to spend less movement on dismounting, by throwing themselves off, landing prone, but then quickly getting back up.

Can you target yourself while blinded or invisible?

Several spells, like Healing Word and Hold Person, require you to see your target. Does this mean that you aren’t allowed to target yourself with spells that require you to see your target when you’re blinded or invisible? For reference:

Healing Word

A creature of your choice that you can see within range regains hit points equal to 1d4 + your spellcasting ability modifier. This spell has no effect on undead or constructs.

Hold Person

Choose a humanoid that you can see within range. The target must succeed on a Wisdom saving throw or be paralyzed for the duration. At the end of each of its turns, the target can make another Wisdom saving throw. On a success, the spell ends on the target.

Does haste extra attack gets triggered when you cast haste on yourself?

My question here is what is the right combination of the answers from these two questions:

  • Does Extra attack stack with haste?
  • Can you get an extra attack after casting a spell whilst hasted?

Assuming I’m a level 5 fighter / level 5 wizard and I cast haste on myself.

It’s clear from the second question I can then proceed to use the attack action as per haste. My interpretation:

  • RAW is you get only one attack and extra attack does not get triggered as per the answer to the first question.

RAI it looks like that particular line “one weapon attack only” was intended to limit attack explosion on the fighter:

The “one attack only” stipulation is preventing the use of the extra attack feature in the additional action, so a character with extra attack could use his regular action to make 2 attacks and use the additional action granted by haste to attack once more. This is to prevent say, a fighter at level 20 who gets 3 extra attacks from having 8 attacks in a single turn on top of a possible bonus action.

As specified in the answer of this other question.

Is there any indication (by WOG or similar in either direction) as to where in this particular scenario the fighter would get the extra attack? Which would mean, if you cast haste on yourself on your turn, the effect of casting haste is you get to do your turn as normally without the benefit of haste but also without having lost the action into casting haste.