Can you target yourself with touch spells

I have been asked by one of my players “can I touch myself with a spell the has a range of touch?” Most touch spell say “you touch a willing creature of your choice,” or something along those lines. And my judgement is that you’re willing if you want to impose the effects on yourself. So I say, a touch spell is a spell that is kind of like a self that you can also use on other creatures or characters. Please correct me if I’m wrong and tell if I’m right.

Should casting Confusion centered on yourself from Wild Magic Surge be trivial to end because it’s a concentration spell?

The entry for a roll of 13 or 14 on the Wild Magic Surge table is:

You cast confusion centered on yourself. (PHB, emphasis mine)

Confusion is a 4th level concentration spell. The rules for concentration state that:

If a spell must be maintained with concentration, that fact appears in its Duration entry, and the spell specifies how long you can concentrate on it. You can end concentration at any time (no action required). (PHB)

The intent of the entry on the Wild Magic table seems to be for everyone nearby, including the caster, to be hit by confusion, essentially a less-bad version of casting Fireball centered on yourself. However, since the table doesn’t specify anything special about concentrating on the spell, the caster needs to maintain concentration on it, and consequentially the spell should end if they stop concentrating on it.

RAW, is there any reason someone who rolls this result on the Wild Magic Surge table couldn’t immediately drop concentration and end the spell?

Is there a way to repeatedly make yourself incapacitated, while it’s not your turn?

A lot of player ‘Companions’ (like the Beast and Drake (UA) companion for the Ranger, or the Homunculus Servant or Steel Defender for the artificer) can act more freely if you are incapacitated.

Is there a way of repeatedly imposing that condition on yourself, while it’s not your turn?

The closest I’ve come to it, is triggering your own Tomb of Levistus warlock invocation. But that is not repeatable.

Can you warm yourself up with Fire Bolt?

During my last encounter my 3lvl wizard fell into a trap with freezing water below. He managed to save himself using Levitate, but during my party’s post-game discussion there was a question of getting out of freezing water into an even more freezing air (now wet through) and how it should impact a PC.

A spellcaster using a Ready action can keep any spell with a casting time of 1 action on concentration until start of his next turn.

When you ready a spell, you cast it as normal but hold its energy, which you release with your reaction when the trigger occurs.

If it’s a fire spell and you hold its energy, then it seems reasonable it would release some heat, doesn’t it?

Also, even though you can keep cast and readied spell only until start of your next turn, Fire Bolt is a cantrip so you could just repeat the whole process as long as needed to get oneself sufficiently warmed.

And no, my wizard sadly doesn’t know Prestidigitation.

What happens if you become frightened of yourself?

You might be wondering how this could happen apart from a contrived scenario of casting a spell like cause fear on yourself (which is technically allowed). Turns out, it can happen by interacting with the local wildlife of Icewind Dale.

The Crag Cat has this ability:

Spell Turning. The cat has advantage on saving throws against any spell that targets only the cat (not an area). If the cat’s saving throw succeeds and the spell is of 7th level or lower, the spell has no effect on the cat and instead targets the caster.

So I cast cause fear on a Crag Cat, it passes the save, and then I fail on my save. I become the target of my own cause fear, which means I am now frightened of myself.

The frightened condition says:

  • A frightened creature has disadvantage on ability checks and attack rolls while the source of its fear is within line of sight.
  • The creature can’t willingly move closer to the source of its fear.

Do either of these conditions apply in some way while I am frightened of myself?

You might be thinking, "why not ust drop concentration and end the effect?" Right, that would work, if the caster thought to do that. When this scenario played out in my game, the player character who was frightened of himself was so worked up about being frightened of himself he didn’t even think to drop concentration, which I thought was a great narrative expression of the effect. I ruled on the fly that he used all of his movement on his turn to run about wildly, trying to get away from himself, opting to make a quick ruling without spending much time thinking to preserve the tension of the situation. Now that I have had time to think about it, I’m not sure what the correct ruling would be.

Why is burying yourself not such a great plan?

One of my player is a clever guy. At night when the others are putting the camp together he digs a hole big enough for himself (between 3-4 feet deep) and asks someone to cover his body with dirt; he then uses a straw to breath. His idea is to avoid ambush at night.

The first time I was baffled by this idea and had no response. After a couple of nights I started challenging his strategy. I identified a couple of potential complications but he was able to answer everything I offered.

  • Sleeping under 3 feet of dirt at night would be terribly cold (But I have a bedroll which is warm enough
  • You wouldn’t sleep comfortably and be sore in the morning (No specific rules for sleeping in armor I can use as a reference)
  • Breathing through a straw requires keeping your mouth closed and doing so while you’re sleeping is impossible (I’m an elf and when I’m in trance I’m not asleep so I can keep my mouth shut)

    He has no intention of quickly being able to help the rest of the party if they get attacked, so escaping his hole is not something I can use against him (I tried).

    So far the problem has not transpired out-of-game. I’m annoyed because he’s obviously trolling but the other members of the group don’t mind his selfishness (he doesn’t get XP or loot from attacks at night).

Am I wrong to think that this is not such a great plan? I can’t think of any reason or mechanics to point out the flaws of his plan.

I don’t mind him doing it. I just think I’m not emulating the consequences properly because it’s an obviously stupid decision.

Should you let yourself ssh into every machine in your network?

I am wondering how you should setup your network (AWS) so you can debug different things that might occur. Obviously there’s logging, but it seems at some point you might require SSHing into the actual machine of interest and checking around. If this is the case, it seems you would need to open up port 22 on every machine in the network. To make it secure, I would only allow bastion host to connect to my IP address, and then every other machine only allows connections from the bastion host on the internal network. Is this considered bad practice? If so, what is the right way to go about this situation?

What are the mechanics for hiding something that is not yourself?

How can a cleric hide a living body? asked for cleric spells that would keep the body of an unconscious but live comrade unseen.

I considered Pass without Trace, since it targets creatures with no requirement that the creatures be conscious, but then realized that if the companion was unconscious, it could not make a Stealth check, so a +10 bonus to no roll is still no roll.

That got me thinking of the larger issue of hiding things that don’t get their own checks. Hiding a conscious character (as in preparing an ambush) would be the Help action, providing advantage on the other character’s Stealth roll. But what would you do to represent a character trying to hide something that didn’t get its own rolls?

  1. Is there an established mechanism for this? (I haven’t found any). Looking for something would be a Perception or Investigation, but what would this be contested against?

  2. I am thinking this would be a Survival check, possibly Sleight of Hand for anything small enough to fit in one hand but that might presuppose active observation while trying to hide it. Thoughts?

  3. What sort of conditions would be sufficient for giving the character hiding something a circumstances bonus (advantage)? One would be abundant time…so how long?