If a flying creature with no swim speed ends up in water, can it fly out?

Assuming there is no magic holding it aloft and it doesn’t have the ability to hover, when a flying creature is knocked prone, it falls.

What happens if the creature was flying over a body of water? Can it effectively use its movement to "stand up" on its next turn and resume flying, or does it end up like that video of the bald eagle swimming, where its feathers are too wet and it can’t reasonably get enough lift to take off again?

Ducks can take off from water, but I would argue that ducks have a swim speed.

What is an axe beak’s travel speed in Icewind Dale?

Icewind Dale: Rime of the Frostmaiden gives travel speeds for dogsleds, snowshoes, and on foot (p. 11). On the same page, it says that dogsleds, at 1mph, are the fastest way to get around in the Dale.

However, this section says nothing about axe beaks, which p. 20 offers as a travel option. How fast would these travel?

My gut says if they are speedier than sled dogs (50 vs 40 feet per round, per MM), they might run 1.25 mph. Is this the best/proper way to calculate it? How does this reconcile with sled dogs being the fastest travel method (p. 11)? Do sled dog rest requirements (1 hour after an hour of pulling, p. 20) factor into the answer at all?

If I expanded all my movement, and Zephyr strike increase it by 30ft after my attack, can I finish my movement with the increased speed?

My character is a Ranger with the spell Zephyr Strike, which increase my speed by 30ft after the attack. If I used all my movement to reach the ennemy, can I use the increased 30ft to move away after my attack?

How can I speed up combat with a large number of enemies?

I’m DMing for a campaign where the player characters will sometimes face small squads of creatures, most recently six ground troops and two archers helping out. In this setting, these creatures dominate the land the PCs are in and have an organised military, hence squads of enemies.

Combat tends to go quite slowly, however. Eight enemies and three players means the players spend a lot of time waiting between their turns!

Without reducing the number of enemies in the encounter, how can I speed up combat when the players are fighting many enemies?

Does movement speed add damage or attack power to weapons?

I have a character who has managed to get herself a movement speed of 100′. She is a centaur, and as such specializes in lance based combat and charges. Now in the real world a lance moving faster would have more power behind it. With this centaur moving at 56 MPH and putting her 1473 pounds behind that lance it is striking with a force of 16,726.39 Newtons concentrated down onto the lance tip, which is something rather tiny like a hundred thousandth of an inch. This results in the lance point having 95,510,148 PSI when it strikes a target. This is enough force to pierce up to 8 inches of modern ultra-high carbon steels (assuming no loss of power by friction). In other words that lance is going into and through just about anything that gets in its path.

Now is this knowledge just a fun bit of coolness to know or does D&D reflect physics and give a damage boost for speed of a handheld piercing weapon?

Cache Miss and Processor Speed

today in my class my professor mentioned that

Cache misses becomes more expensive as the speed of the processor increases 

But he didn’t explain the reason. I searched this statement over the internet and found no answer whatsoever.

According to me, this statement is true because, when the speed of the processor increases it can execute more instructions at a given clock cycle, thus a miss leads to a stoppage of more instructions from executing. So cache misses becomes expensive as processor speed increases. Is my thinking correct or am I doing it all wrong?

Can a creature with a natural walking speed of 0 ft. get up from being prone?

In a one-shot I recently played the players were fighting a homebrewed Weeping Angel (stats). It has a walking speed of 0 ft. and can teleport 80 ft. on its turn under some conditions. One of the players knocked the Weeping Angel, which is essentially a statue, over by using the shove action. On its turn, the Weeping Angel was prone with a speed of 0 ft. It then used its Impossible movement to teleport away and appear upright again.

Now there are three options on how to rule this situation:

  1. The Weeping Angel uses half of 0 ft., so still 0 ft., to get up from being prone and proceeds as normal
  2. The Weeping Angel lifts the prone condition simply by teleporting
  3. The Weeping Angel is prone, and can’t get up anymore

According to the rules, which of this rulings (if any) would be correct?